The Edge of Running Water

The Edge of Running Water The Edge of Running Water deals with the adventures of a young psychologist in a remote Maine farm house with the death of a woman and the disappearance of an inventor Against a normal enough backgrou

  • Title: The Edge of Running Water
  • Author: William Sloane
  • ISBN: 9780345286024
  • Page: 349
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • The Edge of Running Water deals with the adventures of a young psychologist in a remote Maine farm house with the death of a woman and the disappearance of an inventor Against a normal enough background, events take on the shape of terror, with a tinge of the unknown hints of things beyond the borderland of the natural, including the strange researches into survival afThe Edge of Running Water deals with the adventures of a young psychologist in a remote Maine farm house with the death of a woman and the disappearance of an inventor Against a normal enough background, events take on the shape of terror, with a tinge of the unknown hints of things beyond the borderland of the natural, including the strange researches into survival after death by a half mad electro physicist Set against these, a tender love story adds an unexpected poignancy and charm.

    One thought on “The Edge of Running Water”

    1. The real shame here is that William Sloane only ever wrote two booksd now I've read them both. As he did with his first novel, 'To Walk the Night,' Sloane once again deftly combines mystery, sci-fi, and horror into an eloquent and suspenseful tale about an obsessed scientist trying to create a machine to speak with his dead wife. Maybe I can track down the short stories he allegedly wrote

    2. As an avid reader of the New York Review of Books, I keep an interest in, and am notified about, the books released by their publications arm New York Review Books. I recently came across a blurb for their recently published omnibus of William Sloane's novels, which intrigued me enough to scout out one of his works, which I fortunately found as a freely borrowable ebook on openlibrary.Fortunate being an appropriate word, as this book rises above the ruck of the run-of-the-mill SciFi and Horror w [...]

    3. I really enjoyed this book. I found it in our room at the Queen Mary and ordered it online to finish. Old time creepy with a lot of suspense. Written in 1939.

    4. Just finished this, the second and last novel by William Sloane. Like his first, TO WALK THE NIGHT, it's reminiscent of Lovecraft, especially "From Beyond." But also like the first, and unlike Lovecraft, Sloane creates vivid characters and dialogue. There's more conventional suspense in this one, and a tremendous payoff to the McGuffin in the locked room, but this one seems less, somehow, than the previous. Still, in his introduction Stephen King feels the opposite, so it may be a matter of tast [...]

    5. I always enjoy reading a book from "long ago". The edition that I got from my library was printed in 1955, with a first printing in the 30s. Anyhow, I enjoyed every page of this horror/mystery/ghost story. The setting is a creepy house at the end of a road in rural Maine. What do you get if you put an eccentric electrophysicist, a cranky medium and a university professor in the same creepy house? You get mayhem, I tell you. But, seriously, this is a well-crafted mystery that keeps you guessing u [...]

    6. Not as good as To Walk The Night, but still an excellent piece of literature. Completely transcends genre tropes (partially because they didn't quite exist to the extent they have over the last four or five decades I suppose). There is an economic pragmatism to Mr. Sloane's work that I enjoy in the same fashion I enjoy Fitzgerald and Hemingway.Highly recommended for fans of Cosmic Horror or Weird Fiction. Especially if you're looking for something 'new' in that arena.

    7. Written at the end of the 30’s. I found the writing style a bit clunky. Had its eerie moments, and some creepy atmospheric bits. It was fine.

    8. William Sloane wrote only two novels, but they were both doozies. The first, "To Walk the Night" (1937), is a combination sci-fi/horror/fantasy/mystery tale concerning a mysterious, otherworldly woman. Two years later, Mr. Sloane came out with "The Edge of Running Water," and this one, I feel, is even better. It concerns an electrophysicist, Dr. Julian Blair, who is attempting to construct an apparatus that will enable him to communicate with his dead wife. The book takes place on a promontory o [...]

    9. This is an enjoyable, well written, old school, vintage sort of chiller. No blood, hardly any monster. But that's not the pointDespite the absence of suspense, it's the atmosphere and the thinking that do the trick here. Forget any pompous description, any super SCI FI experimentation. The topic and the object of the novel are pretty much surpassed now. But this should not put you off.Yes the story is not entirely fresh in today's canons. But the book does entertain you a good old way. The slow [...]

    10. Richard Sayles, an Academic from New York City travels to a small town in Maine to help an old friend, Dr. Julian Blair, who is conducting secretive research with the goal of communicating with the dead. While staying there, a local lady is killed and the locals think it is connected to the strange experiments.The Edge of Running Water is a Horror story first published in 1939. Not surprisingly then, it has a very slow build up. There is a large mystery aspect to the story as the group attempts [...]

    11. This is the second book in The Rim of Morning collection. It is another fine, intriguing novel, this one written in 1939.It is a wonderful mixture of science fiction, horror, and whodunit. I'm truly sorry that Sloane wasn't more prolific because I thoroughly enjoyed both of his novels. They are plainly and concisely written, but still have a nice elegance to them. Stephen King wrote the introduction (which is how I found out about these books) and I can see why he is a fan. Not everyone is capab [...]

    12. After his wife dies, a grieving physics professor embarks on a mysterious experiment in a remote farmhouse. A colleague comes to visit and falls in love with the physicist's niece. Meanwhile, the domineering assistant, Mrs. Walters, has schemes of her own for the professor's research. Although this came highly recommended, the book was really only okay. It was very slow to develop and not very interesting. It picked up somewhat at the end when the professor's machine was finally revealed. There [...]

    13. As far as I know, William Sloane only wrote two novels, both suspense/mystery with a strong sci-fi/horror element. Anyone who enjoys Lovecraft, but would like something a bit more sophisticated, with real characters and a bit less of the overwrought HPL style, will enjoy Sloane. The mystery is truly mysterious, and the characters less one-dimensional than is usual for genre fiction of the 1930's. The plotting moves quickly, but gives nothing away: a page-turner.

    14. Quite possibly the single most over rated piece of fiction I have pushed through in recent memory. Trite, tepid, poorly paced and anti-climactic. No tension, the atmosphere was stilted and forced and I honestly did not care about a single character in the book.A quarter century of hearing about how fantastic this was meant profound disappointment for me. Perhaps there was a reason Sloane wrote only two novels?

    15. More haunting and evocative than its predecessor, To Walk the Night, this novel is a meticulously crafted, vividly realized narrative that skillfully blends weird fiction, traditional gothic horror, mystery, and science fiction.

    16. It would have been interesting to see if Sloane had written more. This and To Walk the Night are good early works, especially for horror books published in the 30s. He was doing some interesting work, but sadly it's all he did.

    17. Stephen King favorably mentioned this book in Chapter 2 of Berkley's 1983 paperback edition of Danse Macabre.

    18. Suspenseful story about a scientist trying to create apparatus to enable him to communicate with his dead wife and featuring a vividly created thoroughly evil female character.

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