Sea, Swallow Me And Other Stories

Sea Swallow Me And Other Stories Ancient folklore and modern myth come together in these stories by author Craig Laurance Gidney Here are found the struggles of a medieval Japanese monk seduced by a mischievous fairy and a young sla

  • Title: Sea, Swallow Me And Other Stories
  • Author: Craig Laurance Gidney
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 146
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Ancient folklore and modern myth come together in these stories by author Craig Laurance Gidney Here are found the struggles of a medieval Japanese monk seduced by a mischievous fairy, and a young slave who finds mystery deep within the briar patch of an antebellum plantation Gidney offers a gay teen obsessed with his patron saint, Lena Horne, and, in the title story, anAncient folklore and modern myth come together in these stories by author Craig Laurance Gidney Here are found the struggles of a medieval Japanese monk seduced by a mischievous fairy, and a young slave who finds mystery deep within the briar patch of an antebellum plantation Gidney offers a gay teen obsessed with his patron saint, Lena Horne, and, in the title story, an ailing tourist seeks escape at a distant shore but never reckons on encountering an African sea god Rich, poetic, dark and disturbing, these are tales not soon forgotten This collection contains the story A Bird of Ice, which was a finalist for the Gaylactic Spectrum Award.

    One thought on “Sea, Swallow Me And Other Stories”

    1. Woah. I don't often read short stories, but this collection was amazing. No wonder Gidney is winning awards. Fantasy stories, mostly contemporary, protags mostly gay and black, but veering off to Rimbaud and Japanese monasteries and suchlike, just because the author can. Stunning writing, stunning imagination, very unsettling. I just bought Skin Deep Magic: Short Fiction on the back of this, and am pretty much going to work through everything I can get my hands on. A really excellent writer.

    2. I’m not honestly sure what I thought of this collection. The writing is really strong, and I found that I had to keep turning the pages to get more of it — but some of the stories just grossed me out so much and made me feel really uncomfortable. They’re undoubtedly powerful, but not really a style that I enjoy. There’s a bit in the description that about sums this set of stories up: “rich, poetic, dark and disturbing”. Yep.One of the most powerful of the bunch is definitely the mos [...]

    3. This is really a strange anthology and not a romance at all; some of the characters are gay men, both modern or myth or figures from the past, but it's not them being gay that linked all the story, it's more the unexpected and the legend, the faith and the myth mixed together.The Safety of Thorns: Israel is a slave boy who lives in a plantation; he is very young (don't know exactly the age but he is still working little jobs around, so I believe he is nothing more than a child). One day, near th [...]

    4. Stunning collection of short stories. Many are written from the perspective of gay, black men, but not entirely so. Gender identity, sexuality, religion, culture, and race are all strong elements of Gidney's work, however, and are handled deftly and compassionately throughout. All of the stories feature elegant, well crafted, highly poetic prose, and have a touch of the supernatural to them. Characters in these tales venture into fairy-tale like moral lessons, and confront mythic personification [...]

    5. My only beef with this book is the typos. They're everywhere, and if a casual reader who isn't even looking for typos can spot them left and right, you know you have a problem. That said, it's a really good book. Craig Laurance Gidney weaves together fantasy, folklore, and reality so deftly that it's quite easy to get lost in his world. It's definitely not light reading, nor would I recommend it to anyone who can't handle a little sex and violence. But it's gorgeous work all the same. Without ge [...]

    6. Wildly inventive and gorgeously written. I don't often reread books, but I would love to pick this up in print form so I could linger over the language more. That said, the audiobook is beautifully and feelingly narrated. This is top-notch speculative fiction. Don't miss it!!

    7. Been following his blog for over a year, now, and haven't gotten off my behind and bought the book. Julia Rios's rec is just what I needed to make me actually go to the bookshop and order it :)

    8. Reading Challenge 2018: book set at sea. This delightful book of short stories includes mythological creatures and deities from pantheons that are not often discussed. Orisha from Africa, kami and yosei from Japan. The language was elegant and description, providing mental pictures of the story. The style reminded me of Barker's erotic horror stories. The tales were unique and fresh, leaving me with my thoughts as I tried to wrap my head around them. I will definitely seek out more from this aut [...]

    9. Honestly I wasn't really impressed with this book. There were a few stories I really liked and the rest were just okay. Also, the copy I have is an ARC, so it's got a lot of mistakes, which hopefully were corrected in the final proof (the most annoying one was in the Japanese story, where Amaterasu was misspelled as Amaratsu throughout the story).

    10. While not everything worked equally well for me, which is usually the case with collections, I thought "Circus-Boy Without a Safety Net" was wonderful, and closing the collection with "Catch Him By the Toe" left a deep and lasting impression.

    11. Some of these stories didn't really work for me, not a big horror fan and some edged into horror. But some were enjoyable, though I do worry about this authors relationship with his mother.

    12. The language was super pretty reading it. I think my favorite story out of it was Come Join We. Each story was original and full of life which made them great reads!

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