Far from Gringo Land

Far from Gringo Land Rick Dresner is spending the summer with the Romero family who live in a barrio in the hills of Santo Domingo Mexico He ll help them build a house on their land and in return they ll provide room

  • Title: Far from Gringo Land
  • Author: Edward Myers
  • ISBN: 9780547056302
  • Page: 237
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Rick Dresner is spending the summer with the Romero family, who live in a barrio in the hills of Santo Domingo, Mexico He ll help them build a house on their land, and in return, they ll provide room and board and help Rick improve his Spanish But the construction project turns out to be a lot tougher than Rick had imagined Language and cultural differences lead to awkwRick Dresner is spending the summer with the Romero family, who live in a barrio in the hills of Santo Domingo, Mexico He ll help them build a house on their land, and in return, they ll provide room and board and help Rick improve his Spanish But the construction project turns out to be a lot tougher than Rick had imagined Language and cultural differences lead to awkwardness and misunderstanding, especially when he falls for a rich American girl from a very different part of town In this new twist on the classic fish out of water story, it s a middle class white boy who s out of his element and must change and grow to adapt to his surroundings.

    One thought on “Far from Gringo Land”

    1. Far From Gringo Land is a memoir by Edward Myers. He wrote another book called Story Teller, and he grew up in Colorado, Mexico, and Peru. The book, Far From Gringo Land, is about when he went to Mexico and was living with some friends from his parents. Also when he was there, he wasn’t there for vacations, he was there to help them build a house. It was hard for him because he had to get used to living in Mexico, like the food and weather, but he has a hard time. The story takes place in Mexi [...]

    2. Reviewed by hoopsielv for TeensReadTooRick jumps at the opportunity to spend his seventeenth summer in a Mexican barrio. He'll be able to improve his Spanish, live with family friends, and help them build a real house on their property. He's confident that he will learn a lot about life in a completely different culture.He learns quickly that the Romeros are a struggling family who put their guest as their priority even if it means they go without. He doesn't even mind being called a "gringo" by [...]

    3. Review originally posted on my old YA Materials blog.Far from Gringo Land is an interesting look into a topic that teens have heard about but provides them with an easy-going narrator and a first-hand account of what life could be like in other countries and how much it varies from life in the United States. As far as the plot line goes, Myers deviates from the typical fish-out-of-water story, continuously throwing new setbacks and problems in Rick's path. Even when he feels like he is stronger [...]

    4. Rick is spending the summer between his junior and senior year in an unusual way. He’s in a small town in Mexico helping family friends with “la obra” – a construction project building a house. His Spanish is only passable and his brick-laying skills non-existent, but he is determined to pull his weight. The “gringo” girl he meets and the family’s money woes complicate things. This story has so much potential – a middle class white kid from Denver spending his days with a poor M [...]

    5. The book, to say the least, is a massive bore. In short, the book lacks a lot of detail, a lot of the conversations feel rather flat and generic, and in general the storyline is just so cliche. It has the typical "rough start, things get better, things get worse, things get better" type of storyline that you see all the time.The concept in itself is great, but it seems the writer failed to use much creativity. Most of the story either revolves around the construction project or Rick's crush on t [...]

    6. Edward Myers has produced a literary work of eye-opening proportions. "Far from Gringo Land" stirs your heart and mind as it follows a young man coming into his own on an adventure in the truths and justice of multiple cultures far from home. Rick Dresner finds himself in the barrios of Mexico (by choice), working like a donkey, finding a new family, struggling with his own life choices, and falling for a girl who is trying to do the same. This book is an excellent and stunning example of the co [...]

    7. Slow and steady, this tale of an American teen who helps his parents' Mexican friends build their house wins as a study in cultural contrasts and loses as a thrilling novel. Yes, it's hard to build a lot of suspense while everyone's hauling bricks and concrete, but Edward Myers is a gamer, and he at least includes a love interest (a rich but sweet American girl living in a gated community for rich Americanos).May especially interest Spanish teachers as a reading text in their class (yes, it's in [...]

    8. This won't win literature prizes, but provides a useful look at the important area of cultural clash and attempts to bridge it from a teen perspective. Many books deals with an immigrant's attempt to deal with the majority U.Slture, but this is about a US majority culture teen's attempts to understand and connect during a summer in Mexico.

    9. A high school student visits Mexico the summer before his senior year. He lives with old family friends and helps them build their new house. He also finds romance.Authentic representation of Mexican culture. Translations can get didactic.

    10. I wanted to like this story about a middle class kid going to Mexico to work on helping build a house while improving his Spanish but it was pretty boring and predictable.

    11. This Book was not my favorite. The wording and vocabulary was very simple and it made the book very boring. half the book was Spanish phrases and then there translations. It was not a very good book.

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