Theories of Vision from Al-kindi to Kepler

Theories of Vision from Al kindi to Kepler Kepler s successful solution to the problem of vision early in the seventeenth century was a theoretical triumph as significant as many of the celebrated developments of the scientific revolution Yet

  • Title: Theories of Vision from Al-kindi to Kepler
  • Author: David C. Lindberg
  • ISBN: 9780226482354
  • Page: 449
  • Format: Paperback
  • Kepler s successful solution to the problem of vision early in the seventeenth century was a theoretical triumph as significant as many of the celebrated developments of the scientific revolution Yet the full import of Kepler s arguments can be grasped only when they are viewed against the background of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance visual theory David C LindbKepler s successful solution to the problem of vision early in the seventeenth century was a theoretical triumph as significant as many of the celebrated developments of the scientific revolution Yet the full import of Kepler s arguments can be grasped only when they are viewed against the background of ancient, medieval, and Renaissance visual theory David C Lindberg provides this background, and in doing so he fills the gap in historical scholarship and constructs a model for tracing the development of scientific ideas David C Lindberg is professor and chairman of the department of the history of science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

    One thought on “Theories of Vision from Al-kindi to Kepler”

    1. The most interesting thing I got out of the book was that Kepler was the first to realize that light has mass enough to move things - he called this force the vis motrix. IIRC, it was Newton who rightly corrected the vis motrix out of Kepler's theory of vision, but then, around 500 years later, people decided Kepler's physics were pretty reasonable, and light does indeed have force. Remarkable.The book's definitely a little on the dry side; on the other hand, it draws a direct line from Aristotl [...]

    2. Fascinating exploration of how classic science was transformed in Islamic cultures before returning to Europe.

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