Shot-Blue

Shot Blue Shot Blue is that rarest species a genuinely wise novel Rivka GalchenRachel is a young single mother living with her son Tristan on a lake that borders the unchannelled north remote nearly inhospi

  • Title: Shot-Blue
  • Author: Jesse Ruddock
  • ISBN: 9781552453407
  • Page: 453
  • Format: Paperback
  • Shot Blue is that rarest species, a genuinely wise novel Rivka GalchenRachel is a young single mother living with her son, Tristan, on a lake that borders the unchannelled north remote, nearly inhospitable She does what she has to do to keep them alive But soon, and unexpectedly, Tristan will have to live alone, his youth unprotected and rough The wild, open plac Shot Blue is that rarest species, a genuinely wise novel Rivka GalchenRachel is a young single mother living with her son, Tristan, on a lake that borders the unchannelled north remote, nearly inhospitable She does what she has to do to keep them alive But soon, and unexpectedly, Tristan will have to live alone, his youth unprotected and rough The wild, open place that is all he knows will be overrun by strangers strangers inhabiting the lodge that has replaced his home, strangers who make him fight, talk, and even love, when he doesn t want to Ravenous and unrelenting, Shot Blue is a book of first love and first loss.

    One thought on “Shot-Blue”

    1. "It's a kind of death when you don't go home the same."This novel starts out promising, about a mother and son in isolated cold island life. It felt like the majority of Room, with a slightly older boy. As the boy starts navigating more of this harsh life on his own, I was reminded of those survival books so many of us love as teens, like My Side of the Mountain. The writing, about nature and isolation, is beautiful. By the end of the book it feels like the author has wound down into describing [...]

    2. It is beautiful and tangible. It was dipping your feet into the cold water, of the early summer morning. It was breath-taking and raw and tender. It was a single mother and son relationship to a silence of adsolence, to grow of loss, bullying, first-love and creating a path of choice for himself. Tristan is a character that is sheltered and isolated and almost forgetable. It is heavy to grasp at first to grasp the idea and content of the book, however, once you get through, its un-put-downable. [...]

    3. I am thus far consumed with Book One (the first part of the novel), which is very dream-like, very unnerving, and quite gripping in its emotional reach.I don't pretend to understand the actions of any of the characters, all of whom seem rather detached from their own motivations. They all seem to carry out cruel, selfish and at times inhumane decisions without any care for repercussions, like the sparse northern lands can be so cruel, selfish and inhumane as to effect this response in the people [...]

    4. This is a coming of age story about a young boy, Tristan, who lives with his mother on an unnamed and isolated Canadian island. Despite the wildness and remote setting it is a claustrophobic relationship and existence for the boy, and he lacks many social skills when he is with other children. The novel starts out really well but lapses into saying similar things. Tristan gets older, his life changes, but not significantly enough to have the reader's interest stimulated. There are other well-des [...]

    5. Ruddock's tale is woven from a unique blend of realism and purple prose, added with a dash of mystery to form an interesting and mesmerizing concoction of literary ideas. It showcases humanity's weakness in terms of loneliness and how there are few people in this world who regard loneliness as being more positive than negative. It is these people that are seen as outsiders, and something to be mocked and unable to be explained. Set in the North where it is "uninhabitable" and cut off from all me [...]

    6. The beginning of Shot-Blue was mysterious and left me asking questions in such a way that I was drawn in by the book and its' characters. Arguably the blueprint of any well-written tale. Book Two nonetheless, was unrelated to the first chapter and left me feeling lost, as though I had accidentally missed out a portion of the narrative that explained where the book was now taking me. The storyline as a whole was very detail-oriented and focussed on magnifying the banal in very poetic ways. Unfort [...]

    7. See my full review hereThis is one of the most splendid books I’ve read in the past year. I don’t think I have been as charmed by a book since I read And the Birds Rained Down, last year. It’s one of those books that is quietly beautiful and seeps into you.This book is not about the plot – it’s about emotions and imagery. It’s as if Ruddock is actually sharing a painting. Those aren’t words - they’re broad brushstrokes. This isn’t just a book - it’s a great Canadian landscape [...]

    8. There are three things that matter in books: plot, characters, and writing. These three things aren't weighted equally, however, as some people, myself included, prefer characters over plot, others like the opposite, but the most important thing is the writing. In Shot-Blue, Ruddock decides to cut out the whole plot and characters part almost entirely and focus purely on the writing.And that is both this book's biggest asset and also its downfall. Because the writing is, without a doubt, beautif [...]

    9. I picked up this book because I saw it in a picture. I didn't know anything about what to expect from it, and after reading it, I still have a bit of that sensation left. I think I could read it ten more times and feel new things. I'm not yet sure what I've come away thinking about it this time, but there's a lot of sticky tabs poking out the side at me from where I marked thoughts and moments that I connected with, so I must have come away with something. I don't know if I'll remember these cha [...]

    10. As mentioned in other reviews, "Shot-Blue" reminded me of Donoghue's "Room."Interesting read. Original voice. Odd and beautiful passages, along with disjointed ones. Dialogue and behavior of young people and adults believable at times; otherwise, stilted and unreal, as though everyone is uncomfortable and terribly self-conscious being around other humans. Also can't remember when I last read a book with so many POVs. Don't know that anyone didn't have their say. Readers even given access to the [...]

    11. What a strange, long trip it's been difficult to follow at times. I felt like I was in the mind of someone with Autism. The dialogue was challenging to read, I don't recommend reading with a glass of wine, as you will find yourself re-reading to understand. I hated the ending. What happened??

    12. This book will not be for everyone. There is no pat ending. I loved the sparse language and how this matched with the sparsity of nature and the environment described.

    13. I bounced off this novel, hard. Like a Jackson Pollock painting. I know there's meaning in it, but I can't get to it. A strange mix of beautiful sentiments expressed too simply and too-simple sentiments expressed beautifully.

    14. In "Shot-Blue", we meet Rachel who is a single mother raising her son Tristan in a small isolated community. They are barely able to survive, but she manages to provide a level of subsistence.When she disappears one day, young Tristan is unprepared; however, he manages to get work and in the process matures much faster than someone of his age.Thank you GoodReads for the book.

    15. 2 1/2 ⭐stars. A novel of sensations. Focusing more on the inner and the outer and a pretty obscure plot. This was well written but it just wasn't right for me.

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