Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children

Becoming Brilliant What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children In just a few years today s children and teens will forge careers that look nothing like those that were available to their parents or grandparents While the U S economy becomes ever information driv

  • Title: Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children
  • Author: Roberta Michnick Golinkoff Kathy Hirsh-Pasek
  • ISBN: 9781433822391
  • Page: 229
  • Format: Paperback
  • In just a few years, today s children and teens will forge careers that look nothing like those that were available to their parents or grandparents While the U.S economy becomes ever information driven, our system of education seems stuck on the idea that content is king, neglecting other skills that 21st century citizens sorely need.Becoming Brilliant offers solIn just a few years, today s children and teens will forge careers that look nothing like those that were available to their parents or grandparents While the U.S economy becomes ever information driven, our system of education seems stuck on the idea that content is king, neglecting other skills that 21st century citizens sorely need.Becoming Brilliant offers solutions that parents can implement right now Backed by the latest scientific evidence and illustrated with examples of what s being done right in schools today, this book introduces the 6Cs collaboration, communication, content, critical thinking, creative innovation, and confidence along with ways parents can nurture their children s development in each area.

    One thought on “Becoming Brilliant: What Science Tells Us about Raising Successful Children”

    1. This is a book that reinforces what I have already read about, incorporate into my educational values, and try to use in my professional practice as a school librarian (teacher). My school library colleagues will already be familiar with the Partnership for 21st Century Skills frequently mentioned in this book, and they will recognize the 6Cs (collaboration, communication, content, critical thinking, creative innovation, and confidence) as the concepts on which our AASL national standards for st [...]

    2. So I should probably start out by saying, that I am probably not the target audience for this book. Not because I am an allstar parent (I literally let my son get kicked in the head yesterday by a grown woman), or so brilliant myself, but because what this book is really about is the state of American students and the skills we are and, more urgently, are not helping them develop. Because of my work, this is a topic I spend a lot of time reading and thinking about (and a lot of time internalizin [...]

    3. Creativity and problem-solving skills are the critical ideas highlighted by many of the scientists I have already read and revere (Carol Dweck, Elena Bodrova & Deborah Leong, Vygotsky) and in Becoming Brilliant, Golinkoff and Hirsh-Pasek quote their work to make the case that stressing learning facts and content is the wrong approach for educators and parents. Science has shown repeatedly that children learn best through play. Actually, so do adults. Successful schools and workplaces will em [...]

    4. Another one of those parenting books that really would've been better as a pamphlet. I totally agree with the authors that content isn't the most important component of learning, especially in a changing world, and I appreciated their input on how to find more learning opportunities for our children (and ourselves!).

    5. I just finished reading Becoming Brilliant by Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, PhD and Kathy Hirsh-Pasek, PhD. I think it is an important book for parents and educators to read. Here are some of the main points that stood out to me as I summarize my notes for each chapter.Collaboration, communication, content, critical thinking, creativity and confidence have been identified through scientific research as key skills all children need to meet their future with success. “If scientist do not share wha [...]

    6. Pretty good book by two experts in education. My one year old is still too tiny for me to apply most of thier insights, which are largely geared towards school age children. This book has just as much, if not more, to say to policy makers and teachers. Though I daresay must teachers already know that children are poorly served by the politicians emphasis on standardized tests to evaluate performance. Two major themes of the book: 1. emphasis on standardized testing is bad and generally counterpr [...]

    7. This a book on educational philosophy by a couple of child psychologists that my spouse ordered when he felt like he was not doing a good job motivating and educating a child. The authors are promoting the six-C method to education, but it really doesn't matter what the Cs are. Their approach teaches children skills like creativity, confidence, and perseverance over rote memorization. The modern classrooms they were envisioning were places with chairs that required the students to sit and do wor [...]

    8. Far too heavy on the discussion of what is wrong or insufficient with contemporary education in the US. As a parent of elementary school aged children I hoped to find specific recommendations on activities we could do at home or ways to approach our school about implementing changes. I was not able to finish the book, life is too short to finish reading something that falls short of expectations. For a reader interested in the numbers and stats behind America's lagging schools, this might be a d [...]

    9. I liked this book more than I thought, although it was a bit repetitive and was preaching to the choir. I am lucky enough to have my children in a private school that uses the techniques in this book to create well-rounded children versed in collaboration and critical thinking, as opposed to mere content and teaching for the test. It did give me ideas for how to reinforce those notions more at home, and especially how to help my kids build confidence in their skills.

    10. I wish I had read this book before I started teaching (or having children for that matter). A lot of helpful and easy to understand information about children developing the "6Cs" necessary for success -- key skills that help children become thinkers: Collaboration, Communication, Content, Critical Thinking, Creativity, Confidence. Teachers, parents, grandparents, and caregivers will find this book most useful.

    11. I struggled with the "science" of this book. Edison did not invent electricity and planful is not a word. I felt like the authors were continually trying to justify themselves as scientists. I also have the perspective of both teacher and parent, and I feel that many teachers and schools in the US are doing the things this book recommends but getting very little credit. All the focus was on the places we are failing.

    12. The book was fine, but it was basically just preaching to the choir! This quote from the epilogue sums it all up succinctly: "ing how our children learn, appreciating that there is more than content, that the social child is best equipped to be the smart child, that creativity is the currency of our time, and that the best learning occurs when we fail along the way."

    13. Good book for raising questions about nurturing a healthy, happy, and confident child. Read this when my daughter was 2 months and suddenly I had an urge to foster an open environment for her to reach her full potential. Bonus: reading the book was a great chance for me to reflect on myself. Whether I'm good enough for the future society.

    14. Some good research and I agree with many conclusions. Learning should not be rote memorization and needs to be innovative while also being able to use critical thinking to make evidence-based conclusions.

    15. Shallow and packed with clichesI couldn't finish this book. It was full of just- so stories and tired cliches plucked from a smattering of recent business books and pop psychology books. Save your money.

    16. So this had great content, but was written WAY to much the formula that I used to use in my high school history class. Also I wish it had more practical application, there was some, but I would have loved to see more.

    17. Straightforward to read, a little bit repetitive, but that repetition also makes it easy to skip around through the sections. Each section has good examples of tangible actions one can take around children to help guide development.

    18. This basically just reinforced things I already think I liked the set-up of relaying the info. they had through the 6 C's.

    19. Wow, I'm not sure I can even get into how bad this book is. It is scary to me that these authors are on boards directing people on children. Just wow.

    20. A good review of how we should change education. It offers some good advice for how to help your kids out of school learn and become a better thinker.

    21. There were parts of this book that seemed to drone on, but for the most part it was an easy read. I rated it so highly, not because of the writing quality, but because of the quality of idea. This book is packed with great information on how to foster success in your child, and yourself. What more could any parent want than to raise children who will have bright, successful futures and be good people to boot?I would definitely recommend this book to parents and educators.

    22. This is a great way to look at how we educate children and even ourselves as adults. Kathy and Roberta do a great job of making sure their 6C's become common sense ideas and maintain their relevance not only for this moment in time but forever.

    23. Rating this an "it was okay" because that's what it was - nothing wrong, just not interesting enough to hold my attention long enough to get it finished.

    24. totally ready to be a parent now! :-D I'll try to put some of these theories to use. interesting read. I'm sure I'll pick this book up whenever I'm feeling a struggle as I parent.

    25. Took forever for me to finish which is usually the case when I have a book that is information instead of a story. Good concepts in this book. I expect to use some as we raise our kids.

    26. This book reinforced what I already knew, and that is that America's educational system by and large doesn't match how children actually learn. The definitions and descriptions of the 4 stages for each of the 6 C's (collaboration, communication, content, critical thinking, creative innovation, and confidence) were informative and useful, and I loved the examples of ways to incorporate learning these skills through play and everyday interactions at home. There were also some great examples of ind [...]

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