Kaffka, the Holy Grail, and a Woman Who Reads: The Quests of Sir Kay

Kaffka the Holy Grail and a Woman Who Reads The Quests of Sir Kay Peace has finally been achieved and it sucks At least for Sir Kay I mean nobody really likes the cold and the fear of war but compared with now That delicious dark roasted heady beverage Merlin bro

  • Title: Kaffka, the Holy Grail, and a Woman Who Reads: The Quests of Sir Kay
  • Author: Rusty Rhoad
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 165
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Peace has finally been achieved and it sucks At least for Sir Kay.I mean, nobody really likes the cold and the fear of war, but compared with now That delicious, dark roasted heady beverage Merlin brought back from the Middle East, kaffa, is long gone Arthur expects Kay to run castle and kingdom, just because he s the only person in 6th century Britain who can do algebrPeace has finally been achieved and it sucks At least for Sir Kay.I mean, nobody really likes the cold and the fear of war, but compared with now That delicious, dark roasted heady beverage Merlin brought back from the Middle East, kaffa, is long gone Arthur expects Kay to run castle and kingdom, just because he s the only person in 6th century Britain who can do algebra if a knight rides forth from Camelot at three leagues per hour Guinevere treats him as her personal gofer Middle age is fast upon Kay, and the only quest available is to rescue Miffy, a fair but empty headed lady s imprisoned dog.Ah, but who knows what adventures lie out there, away from the comforts of Camelot The Holy Grail, if one were interested in such a bauble Magic, in the form of an ageless beauty with a treacherous reputation, Morgan le Fay Perhaps the ultimate prize, a woman who reads.Or maybe just a night under the stars with no liveried page, face and fingernails scrubbed clean of any trace of dirt, uttering those detested words, Sire, the Queen requests your presence Kaffka, the Holy Grail, and a Woman Who Reads The Quests of Sir Kay is a warm, humorous glimpse of Arthurian times through the eyes of a Knight of the Round Table who also happens to be a little shall we say, geeky Sir Kay is a keen observer witty, introspective, and sarcastic at times driven by a sharp intellect and a deep longing for something .

    One thought on “Kaffka, the Holy Grail, and a Woman Who Reads: The Quests of Sir Kay”

    1. Reading this novel set in 6th-century Britain requires exercising a willing suspension of disbelief because it is rife with anachronisms and historical inaccuracies. Sir Kay refers, for example, to the story of Aladdin and the magic lamp, an 18th-century addition to the 9th-14th-century The Thousand and One Nights, on page 5; he alludes to Lord Acton’s 19th-century dictum about absolute power corrupting absolutely on page 7; he mentions “the beast with two backs” from Shakespeare’s Othel [...]

    2. A great, bawdy romp through Camelot, full of witty humor and clever vernacular. I laughed out loud on several occasions, and sometimes--gasp--I even blushed ;) It reminded me of Don Quixote - Sir Kay taking Don Quixote's place, and his faithful squire Oswald taking the role of Sancho Panza. Great fun.

    3. I was given a copy of Kaffka, the Holy Grail, and a Woman Who Reads: The Quests of Sir Kay by the author's assistant and asked to review it. My review reflects my own opinions.The Quests of Sir Kay is a quick and funny read with a 6th c Sir Kay (King Arthur's foster brother), who could very easily be transplanted to the 21st century. This also appears to be the case for Rusty Rhoads' other books, which also have Arthurian characters, although they are living in the 21st century US. Sir Kay is bu [...]

    4. Kaffka, The Holy Grail, and a Woman who Reads: The Quests of Sir KayOne of the current commonplaces of literary advice is not to have several characters with similar names. Too confusing for a reader, they say…but in Kaffka, The Holy Grail, and a Woman who Reads: The Quests of Sir Kay, you’ve got Morgan and Morgause and Galahad and Galahaut and that’s how it has to be, since that’s how it was!The hero and narrator, Sir Kay, isn’t too fond of his name, though—seems a bit feminine, and [...]

    5. Very clever! I went from laughing while reading this book, to fearing I'd be struck by lightning (from any number of gods), and back to laughing again. This is definitely Sir Kay and Camelot as never before. Read this book if you are a fan of Arthurian legend but only if you can take a joke. In fact, if I start reading the rest of this author's books immediately and I can read 400 pages in 5 hours and you start reading this book in 30 minutes and you read 400 pages in 4 hours and 45 minutes, how [...]

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