No More Meltdowns: Positive Strategies for Dealing with and Preventing Out-Of-Control Behavior

No More Meltdowns Positive Strategies for Dealing with and Preventing Out Of Control Behavior It could happen at the grocery store At a restaurant At school At home Meltdowns are stressful for both child and adult but Dr Baker can help Author of the award winning Social Skills Picture Book se

  • Title: No More Meltdowns: Positive Strategies for Dealing with and Preventing Out-Of-Control Behavior
  • Author: Jed Baker Carol Stock Kranowitz
  • ISBN: 9781932565621
  • Page: 464
  • Format: Paperback
  • It could happen at the grocery store At a restaurant At school At home Meltdowns are stressful for both child and adult, but Dr Baker can help Author of the award winning Social Skills Picture Book series, Dr Jed Baker offers parents and teachers strategies for preventing and managing meltdowns His 20 years of experience working with children on the autism spectruIt could happen at the grocery store At a restaurant At school At home Meltdowns are stressful for both child and adult, but Dr Baker can help Author of the award winning Social Skills Picture Book series, Dr Jed Baker offers parents and teachers strategies for preventing and managing meltdowns His 20 years of experience working with children on the autism spectrum, combined with his personal experiences raising his own children, have yielded time tested strategies, and results Dr Baker offers an easy to follow, 4 step model that will improve your everyday relationships with the children in your life 1 Managing your own emotions by adjusting your expectations, 2 Learning strategies to calm a meltdown in the moment, 3 Understanding why a meltdown occurs, and 4 Creating plans to prevent future meltdowns Helpful chapters include Meltdowns When rewards and punishments are not enough What are meltdowns made of Accepting and appreciating our children De escalating a meltdown Understanding why repeat problems occur Creating a prevention plan Demands Waiting Threats to self image Unmet wishes for attention

    One thought on “No More Meltdowns: Positive Strategies for Dealing with and Preventing Out-Of-Control Behavior”

    1. ForewardSisyphus – punished for all eternity by having to push a huge boulder up a hill where it hovers for a nanosecond and topples back down to the bottom Sisyphus has to chase after the boulder put his shoulder to it and push it up the hill again and again and again.Do you know someone like Sisyphus? Someone who frustrates or angers you with a contrary response to an ordinary demand? (keep your hands to yourself) And does this person lack the skills to change his behavior? And do you try to [...]

    2. Practical and helpful guide, especially if you have neuro-divergent children. Was recommended to us by the psychologist we see for one of our children.

    3. I love this book because it's smart, succinct, compassionate, and highly readable for busy parents and teachers. Baker's strategies focus on addressing root causes of behavior problems without placing blame on either children or adults. It's all about doing what works to help everybody be functional and happy!

    4. A great book with helpful information on how to prevent and reduce the number and intensity of meltdowns.

    5. Having read several of Jed Baker's books, I held off on reading this one, knowing that the others had been excellent, but wanting to see what useful information this one would have to offer. The best section in it for me was the explanation on brain regions, fight or flight response and reptilian brains. An excellent, simple, explanation, it made a great deal of sense. The other stuff in the bookt so much. This is not the fault of the book itself, but its intended audience. It doesn't appear to [...]

    6. This is a great parenting book. I learned many of these techniques in workshops but it is great to have them summarized in a book. One of my favorite concepts is that at some point it doesn't matter if a child is melting down as a public demonstration or because they are incapable of dealing with the situation. Regardless, when a child has frequent meltdowns, it is time for teaching new skills, restructuring and showing compassion rather than time for harsh discipline.And the examples at the end [...]

    7. This book really hit it on the head with my son's meltdown issues. There were a lot more specific suggestions than I anticipated being included in the book and I have already started implementing a few ideas. I will need to go back and read certain sections again in order to pick up more ideas. I loved how the author used real life anecdotes of real children and their families to illustrate each point. He did an excellent job of citing research (his own or that of others) and presenting it and p [...]

    8. Many of the parenting books I have read seem unrealistic in application. Dr. Baker, however, has simply and logically presented what seems like a very reasonable plan in dealing with misbehavior. Emphasizing the importance of consistency, and addressing multiple avenues of recourse, I felt like his approach was something that any parent can implement. Some of the situations ring very true in our home, and I am looking forward to using his process in reducing meltdowns and tantrums in our home.

    9. I was overall disappointed with this book. Most of the "strategies" discussed really seemed vey much like common sense. Pretty much none of the suggestions can be applied to my son who is non verbal autistic. There seems to be a definite lack of any books that focus on helping kids like mine and so I guess I shouldn't have expected this book to be any different. I can't have the kind of conversations with my son that the book refers to in every scenerio and example.

    10. This book was given to me by my son's counselor. It has step-by-step instructions for cooling off a tantrum while it's happening, and then guides you through training your child to not have tantrums. It approaches almost every conceivable situation with individual methods that follow a basic formula.I have had a few successful situations following this book. I think it has good basics as long as the parent is willing to follow through.

    11. Recommended for: therapists or parents who like their ABA with a little attachment parenting. One of the biggest things the families I work with struggle with is separating the "can't" from the "won't". This very short, easily digestible book puts forth no revolutionary ideas, but it does help caregivers, teachers, and professionals identify possible reasons for the "can't," as well as steps to address it.

    12. I picked up a few new effective strategies, especially the idea of breaking down tasks like trying new foods into smaller components. For the most part, if you've already read a lot about sensory processing disorder and/or ASD, much of this will be familiar. The book does have a quick, easy format, so it's a good option for adding tools to that meltdown toolbox.

    13. Good book. Provides lots of detail about the process of social autopsy when there is a behavioral situation with children. Focuses on the "why" of the behavior and not the "what happened." In other words, it shows the reader how to be proactive in dealing with special needs children. Easy, quick, read.

    14. I liked some of the specific strategies recommended. I didn't like that he says that if rewards and punishments aren't working, then you need a new strategy, but then goes on to use rewards and punishments as part of the new strategy. I have read in numerous other sources that research shows rewards and punishments are countereffective.

    15. A worthy read. Provides a great framework for behavior management. I am particularly supportive of the bottom line: de-escalating a meltdown should be in an emergency plan. Once that occurs, it's time to make a change. Has good, real-life examples and an outline for the reader to use when designing his/her own plan.

    16. Great book on dealing with meltdowns and other behaviors. Fabulous strategies and management techniques. Author also very funny and makes it an enjoyable read. Saw author at conference, incredible speaker. He has been in the field for over 20 yrs. but is very fresh in his approach because he is still in the field and not just doing speaking engagements.

    17. Good book for parents wanting some basic advice on how to structure a new behavior plan. It probably could be much shorter since most of the text repeats itself many times. I found maybe one or two things that were helpful.

    18. This book is great for those parents of children who have special needs, whether they are language barriers, autism spectrum disorders, or other needs. I would recommend using this in conjunction with "Parenting with Love & Logic" by the Fays.

    19. Nothing hugely ground-breaking here, but I appreciated the systematic way of looking at a tantrum/meltdown in terms of antecedents, behaviors, and consequences. I realize that I can be more planful in avoiding toddler tantrums.

    20. Sadly (yet not unexpectedly) this book has not magically eliminated meltdowns at our house, but did give me some valuable insight and ideas. Helped me to reframe our challenges in a more positive way and that helps me to respond more constructively.

    21. This was a great book and was particularly helpful in laying out plans/ideas for how to deal with extreme meltdowns. It also was a good reassurance that the meltdowns were not the fault of the parent.

    22. Ik heb de nederlandse versie van Jed Baker gelezen, driftbuien en woedeaanvallen. krijg deze echter niet op , maar dit is de engelse versie als ik het goed begrijp.

    23. This was okay -- but a little too basic for my needs. A few good tips, but a lot of thing I'd seen before.

    24. Read book before hearing author speak at a conference. Book is light, easy to read, reinforces what I already new while offering tips. Author is a very entertaining speaker!

    25. This book was excellent! It is loaded with good insights and ideas for helping kids cope with difficult situations and change undesirable behaviors.

    26. I'm gathering strategies to deal with my melt-ey 6 year old. It seems like a straightforward, kind book. Not really one you would read unless you need to.

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