The Ponson Case

The Ponson Case From the Collins Crime Club archive the forgotten second novel by Freeman Wills Crofts once dubbed The King of Detective Story Writers and recognised as one of the big four Golden Age crime authors

  • Title: The Ponson Case
  • Author: Freeman Wills Crofts
  • ISBN: 9780008159290
  • Page: 433
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From the Collins Crime Club archive, the forgotten second novel by Freeman Wills Crofts, once dubbed The King of Detective Story Writers and recognised as one of the big four Golden Age crime authors.When the body of Sir William Ponson is found in the Cranshaw River near his home of Luce Manor, it is assumed to be an accident until the evidence points to murder InspFrom the Collins Crime Club archive, the forgotten second novel by Freeman Wills Crofts, once dubbed The King of Detective Story Writers and recognised as one of the big four Golden Age crime authors.When the body of Sir William Ponson is found in the Cranshaw River near his home of Luce Manor, it is assumed to be an accident until the evidence points to murder Inspector Tanner of Scotland Yard discovers that those who would benefit most from Sir William s death seem to have unbreakable alibis, and a mysterious fifth man whose footprints were found at the crime scene is nowhere to be found .This Detective Story Club classic is introduced by Dolores Gordon Smith, author of the Jack Haldean Golden Age mysteries.

    One thought on “The Ponson Case”

    1. Starting this book off I was a bit disappointed because it was so slow. I have only just recently heard of this author and didn't have high hopes for him. I felt I was going to struggle with the book and had thought about giving up immediately- what a good thing I persevered! As I read more the story sped up to such an extent that I had to read it under my desk at work, so anxious was I to discover the culprit!! Everything was brought together perfectly at the end and I sat gobsmacked after fini [...]

    2. First book for me to read by Crofts, and it is highly reminiscent of J.S. Fletcher who wrote at the same time. A very detailed account of Ins. Tanner of Scotland Yard investigating a case. And we follow all the exacting details of hunting clues. The last line of inquiry being a bit more complicated, but it proved something I suspected was happening that precipitated the death of William Ponson. If you've been around the mystery bend more than once you too would probably find yourself making cert [...]

    3. This is an early 1920s 'police procedural'. Third-person narration but concentrating on the thoughts and actions of Scotland Yard's Inspector Tanner as he investigates the death, by drowning (?) of retired businessman Sir William Ponson in the south of England. Several suspects, many reversals of suspicion, etc. In the fashion of the time, meticulous and perhaps over-long, but a decent read. Nearer 3* than 4*.

    4. If you like Police Procedurals then this is the book for you. I don't think that I could think of a better one. Some might find it over long and boring but I really enjoyed this book. The reader is privy to every thought that Inspector Tanner has and is given all the clues. Red herrings abound in this 1920's English country house mystery.

    5. Written in 1921, this is the first (or second) published novel by Freeman Wills Crofts. Crofts was a writer's writer, by which I mean that a major figure such as Raymond Chandler considered Crofts a "master-builder."I must point out that this may be the most even-toned book of any sort I've read in years. This is at once its merit and its flaw. Notice I have given it four out of five stars. It is nothing if not a throughly thought-out novel. But be prepared for the excitement to derive almost ex [...]

    6. The Ponson CaseI really enjoyed the book. The investigation was far more detailed than modern books but I enjoyed the change of pace. The solution was a surprise. That was, however, the only one of two choices left. Either that push was intentional or an accident.

    7. Solid little mystery with decent twists and turns. Somewhat of an unsatisfying conclusion in my mind, but the journey is decent enough to warrant three stars from me.

    8. The mystery was decent, many twists and turns and very clever, but by Jove it was a bit dull writing and EVERYTHING was described. EVERYTHING! Christ.

    9. I picked this up from Resurrection Press. And there were some typos and layout problems, but not too bad for the price. Ponson Case is a solid circa 1910 mystery.

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