Sex & Love &

Sex Love The most potent ingredient in virtually every one of Bob Hicok s compact well turned poems is a laughter as old as humanity itself The New York Times Book Review Hicok s poems are like boomerangs the

  • Title: Sex & Love &
  • Author: Bob Hicok
  • ISBN: 9781556594755
  • Page: 418
  • Format: Paperback
  • The most potent ingredient in virtually every one of Bob Hicok s compact, well turned poems is a laughter as old as humanity itself The New York Times Book Review Hicok s poems are like boomerangs they jut out in wild, associative directions, yet find their way back to the root of the matter, often in sincere and heartbreaking ways Publishers WeeklyIn Sex Love The most potent ingredient in virtually every one of Bob Hicok s compact, well turned poems is a laughter as old as humanity itself The New York Times Book Review Hicok s poems are like boomerangs they jut out in wild, associative directions, yet find their way back to the root of the matter, often in sincere and heartbreaking ways Publishers WeeklyIn Sex Love , Bob Hicok attempts the impossible task of confronting love and its consequences, in which everything is allowed, minus forever Switching gracefully between witty confessions and blunt confrontations, Hicok muses on age, distance, secret messages, and, of course, sex Throughout, poetry is discovered to be among our most effective tools to examine the delirium of making contact Hot The sexiest thing a woman has ever doneto or with or for me while wearing the loose breezeof a dress or standing inside its red zero on the floor while bending over and pulling her shorts downon a racquetball court or to reach the watershutoff valve behind the fridge as Satiewhispers against our thighs or hummingher brain s native tune as we touchthe smudged glass protecting extinct beetlesin a museum with her lips swaddling my tongueor finger up my ass is tell the truth which makes my wife the hottest womanI ve ever known her mouth erotic every timeshe speaks she is an animal when it comes to sexand love comes to us in that she doesn t primpin front of the mirror of what she thinks I wanther to say or be the only real flesh only nakedthat matters how she looks at meBob Hicok s poems have appeared in the New Yorker, Poetry, and the American Poetry Review His books have been awarded the Bobbitt Prize from the Library of Congress and named a Notable Book of the Year by Booklist Hicok has worked as an automotive die designer and a computer system administrator He is currently teaching at Purdue University.

    One thought on “Sex & Love &”

    1. I've read this book backwards and forwards and lingered over almost every poem. Probably the most joy I've ever gotten from blatant heterosexuality. Sexy and good."For a time we licked toes & liked it& neither of us asked each other to wash"Pick it up to read the rest ;)

    2. Well, that was interesting. Thanks to Karla for lending me a copy. It's 12 am and I'm exhausted. I'm going to bed.

    3. Hicok turns his unflinching attention to intimacies, real and imagined. Sex & love &, yes, death are the dominant themes in this collection. The poems range in subject from the erotic to cancer, technological disconnect to conflicts of gender and identity. All the poems are watermarked by Hicok ' s exuberant cosmicomics (to borrow from Calvino) meaning a sense of humor about our place in the cosmos that is not "ironic", acerbic or mean but in its searching intelligence more akin to truth [...]

    4. These are love poems. Some might better be described as sex poems. But Hicok is about a lot more than those 2 breathtaking themes. For one thing, he has a mischievous sense of humor. But some of these poems also concern themselves with loss or with his own particular place in the universe or how nature informs his love for the woman in the poems, his wife. Hicok is known for his ability to articulate different ways of observing the world around him. There's some of that here, as well, but most o [...]

    5. As usual, Bob Hicok's poetry is cunning and thought-provoking. This time, he takes on--as the title promises--sex and love. It's not a poet's romantic vision of these things, but the clumsy, awkward reality of them. Brilliant book. I couldn't recommend it more highly.

    6. After my good friend's ex-wife took their "Elegy Owed" in the divorce (a Christmas gift from me) and my girlfriend took my personal copy (not a gift from me), forcing me to buy a second personal copy, I made sure to buy two copies this time around. One for myself and a copy for my girlfriend for our anniversary next week. After all, what is one man's humor, honesty, vulnerability, wit, and love for his wife but another man's aphrodisiac?

    7. Bob Hicok is not afraid to write about love and sex and all its human consequences. His musings touch on aging, ambivalence, distance, intimacy, impotence, and marriage. And what's marvelous is how he manages this with wit and humor and tenderness. I mean, "The private life of flesh," a poem that begins speaking of his wife not happy with the fact that one breast is larger than the other ends with, "You think your breasts are weird, look at my testicles, and she does look at my testicles, and my [...]

    8. devious subject matter so very scandalous, but why the chunky paragraphs? Why does bob hicok love chunky paragraphs? Is it pure sloth? Tries to be too abstract, when love and sex is anything but an abstraction. After fasterWe lielaid-shea cocoon of meof me of herin a reciprocal wrap of armsthe fraction of fuckthats friction all overthe faction of affectionthats humpall gone leaving a sleepy potion of semenand lubrication-leaving lovethis poem has promise, definitely relies on aliteration, but is [...]

    9. I always love Hicok's work! He takes gorgeous risks, a kernel of the existential ironic humor of life in the often surprising turns exists in almost all his poems. Beautiful and courageous choices of language. He knit the movement of love and sex so well. I truly give this book a 4.5 stars because I didn't like title which felt a bit boring or trite for such elegance within (and I'm big on 'startling' titles) and because the writing/talking of sex--from men--is so overdone it can feel like the c [...]

    10. I'm guessing the word to follow the second & in the title is not "poetry" as there is precious little of it here. Lots of sex and mild profundities and some damn touching moments, but ultimately not really impacting as poetry. Perhaps I am splitting hairs, but these felt more like micro prose pieces with arbitrary line breaks. I'm not a poetry snob-- in fact, I'm pretty forgiving-- but nothing here made me think, "Wow, this guy is a helluva poet!" More, "This guy is very brave and likes to w [...]

    11. One of the better poem titles: “To join my religion, breathe”and, although it will not be everyone's cup of tea (parental guidance advised), there are some clever ruminations on the body, and, as promised, sex & love:“…My jizz/ is my job and my job is to say,/Look, the void lost./ Where nothing might be, there is something./A fly./ A whisper./ An us.”“…I’m trapped in this falling-apart/ house with legs, this proposition of bone and meat/that was assigned to me by a dresser of [...]

    12. It's a lot about marriage and getting old. It was great- have never read a "page-turner" poetry book before.

    13. Ardent sensuality pervades bob hicok's eighth book sex & love &. These poems are both an ode to his wife Eve (and what they've made between them) and a riotous if slightly guilty celebration of word play. Many poems are frankly carnal. They exude youth (and in at least one case crave youth). Others engage the changing sexuality of older bodies that are getting fatter and graver and less reliable. These last are infused with a mix of defiance and self-deprecating humor. Hicok has created [...]

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