Oh Boy!: Masculinities and Popular Music

Oh Boy Masculinities and Popular Music From Muddy Waters to Mick Jagger Elvis to Freddie Mercury Jeff Buckley to Justin Timberlake masculinity in popular music has been an issue explored by performers critics and audiences From the do

  • Title: Oh Boy!: Masculinities and Popular Music
  • Author: Freya Jarman-Ivens
  • ISBN: 9780415978217
  • Page: 187
  • Format: Paperback
  • From Muddy Waters to Mick Jagger, Elvis to Freddie Mercury, Jeff Buckley to Justin Timberlake, masculinity in popular music has been an issue explored by performers, critics, and audiences From the dominance of the blues singer over his woman to the sensitive singer songwriter, popular music artists have adopted various gendered personae in a search for new forms of expFrom Muddy Waters to Mick Jagger, Elvis to Freddie Mercury, Jeff Buckley to Justin Timberlake, masculinity in popular music has been an issue explored by performers, critics, and audiences From the dominance of the blues singer over his woman to the sensitive singer songwriter, popular music artists have adopted various gendered personae in a search for new forms of expression Sometimes these roles shift as the singer ages, attitudes change, or new challenges on the pop scene arise other times, the persona hardens into a shell like mask that the performer struggles to escape.Oh Boy Masculinities and Popular Music is the first serious study of how forms of masculinity are negotiated, constructed, represented and addressed across a range of popular music texts and practices Written by a group of internationally recognized popular music scholars including Sheila Whiteley, Richard Middleton, and Judith Halberstam these essays study the concept of masculinity in performance and appearance, and how both male and female artists have engaged with notions of masculinity in popular music.

    One thought on “Oh Boy!: Masculinities and Popular Music”

    1. This is a book of articles on masculinity and rock written by a wide variety of authors, all of whom are professors of music (except Judith Halberstam who is in English and Feminist Studies). The subject matter ranges from Elvis, to the mosh pit, to emo, to Justin Timberlake, and to Indonesian pop (just to mention a few). My favorites were Freya Jarman-Ivens' "Don't Cry Daddy" on the degeneration of Elvis' virile masculinity in the course of his career and what that might mean for the (in)stabil [...]

    2. This is not a good book.It is specially not a good book compared to what it promises to be.It promises to be a book that discusses the concept of masculinities within music. It isn't.It is a collection of essays on music performance that uses 'masculinity' as a category of analisys.This is also not a good book for what it is. For a book that wants to use 'masculinity', the range of theories on masculinity, and gender performance more in general, is quite narrow.This might be precisely because th [...]

    3. Easily one of the stupidest covers on a music scholarship anthology, but a fascinating, discursive look at masculinities in contemporary music. Also, it should be credited for covering a lot of ground -- everyone from the Darkness to Devendra Banhart to Jeff Buckley to Eminem to Justin Timberlake to Stephen Merritt are given consideration.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *