Bloody Nasty People: The Rise of Britain's Far Right

Bloody Nasty People The Rise of Britain s Far Right The past decade in the UK saw the rise of the British National Party the country s most successful ever far right political movement and the emergence of the anti Islamic English Defence League Taki

  • Title: Bloody Nasty People: The Rise of Britain's Far Right
  • Author: Daniel Trilling
  • ISBN: 9781844679591
  • Page: 308
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The past decade in the UK saw the rise of the British National Party, the country s most successful ever far right political movement, and the emergence of the anti Islamic English Defence League Taking aim at asylum seekers, Muslims, enforced multiculturalism and benefit scroungers , these groups have been working overtime to shift the blame for the nation s ills ontoThe past decade in the UK saw the rise of the British National Party, the country s most successful ever far right political movement, and the emergence of the anti Islamic English Defence League Taking aim at asylum seekers, Muslims, enforced multiculturalism and benefit scroungers , these groups have been working overtime to shift the blame for the nation s ills onto the shoulders of the vulnerable What does this extremist resurgence say about the state of modern Britain Drawing on archival research and extensive interviews with key figures, such as BNP leader Nick Griffin, Daniel Trilling shows how previously marginal characters from a tiny neo Nazi subculture successfully exploited tensions exacerbated by the fear of immigration, the War on Terror and steepening economic inequality.Mainstream politicians have consistently underestimated the far right in Britain while pursuing policies that give it the space to grow Bloody Nasty People calls time on this complacency in an account that provides us with fresh insights into the dynamics of political extremism.

    One thought on “Bloody Nasty People: The Rise of Britain's Far Right”

    1. It's a weird time to read this book, with the brexit happening thanks to a load of British Anti-EU xenophobes & the rise of the far right throughout all of Europe. This is mostly a book about the British National Party, how it started, who it's best-known member Nick Griffin is and about the rise and subsequent fall of the party. There is not as much background and political context as I would have wished for, not enough interpretation for my taste. I'd say if you've never thought or read mu [...]

    2. A very readable and concise history of the BNP from it's inception and roots, it's rise in political relevance and eventual downfall. The final few chapters focus on the rise of the EDL.Well I suppose writing this review in March of 2015 both the BNP and EDL are largely irrelevant - largely due to their infighting and incompetence (always quite laughable how the 'master race' of weirdo's and deviants struggle to make a cup of tea without falling out - how do they think they'll get on if they eve [...]

    3. This is a very readable history of the rise of far right political parties in Britain. As such, some might find it a little too parochial for general interest. Even so, the ideology behind the thinking of these groups is, I would suggest, a common trait wherever they are found. Judging by the apparent shift towards the extreme right in many if not all Western democracies in recent times, Trilling’s report is timely and cautionary.Most revealing, perhaps, is the methods used by these groups to [...]

    4. Really interesting insight into the BNP and UKIP, despite only a fleeting chance interview with Nick Griffin at the beginning. Aside from that it is a textbook, well researched tome based upon archived interviews and election statistics. Even though there is no grand breakthrough, it is a welcome introduction to a very sinister (but gloriously outdated and irrelevant) part of British political history. Good read.

    5. Timely despite the fact that the BNP appear to be a spent force. This book looks at the history of the far right in Britain and the "rise " of the EDL after "the fall" of the EDL.Trilling canvasses a lot of people, follows the line of society and illustrates the fact that the far right dont exist in a vacuum and that the "3 main" parties in England have a far amount of responsibility for the prominance of the BNP.It wont shock anyone "switched on" but it is important to remind yourself and it is [...]

    6. a really interesting account of the far right movement in Britain documenting many of the names and movements associated with the ideologies in the UK. starting with the national front and then working through to more modern movements such the BNP. the book did a good job of showing the difficulty with which the political mainstream in the UK has failed to address the many issues surrounding these ideologies. Was hoping that this book may have addressed the UKIP and EDL movements in a bit more d [...]

    7. A very good insight into the far right in Britain which gives an up to date account of the BNP and the EDL.Trilling gives some very well though out arguments about where support for the far right comes from and backs this up with recent historical examples. More worrying is his assertion that if they had someone with half a brain in charge they could be quite a challenge to the existing political mainstream.

    8. Good. It does break down the myths behind the rise of the BNP/far right in general though; it all comes down to housing and the lack of it, especially social housing. Right to buy really was ridiculously stupid. I do wish it was a bit longer though No immense surprises through the book though, bar the appearance of a certain Guido Fawkes.

    9. No surprises here, been aware of some of these trends since high school. Rather depressing stuff but good to know there are those who are fighting the good fight against such groups.

    10. Really pulls together the almost symbiotic relationship between mainstream and extremist politics . All politicians should read this- to learn about the dangers of playing the race card.

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