Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity

Clearly Invisible Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity Everybody passes Not just racial minorities As Marcia Alesan Dawkins explains passing has been occurring for millennia since intercultural and interracial contact began And with this profound new st

  • Title: Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity
  • Author: Marcia Alesan Dawkins
  • ISBN: 9781602583122
  • Page: 454
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Everybody passes Not just racial minorities As Marcia Alesan Dawkins explains, passing has been occurring for millennia, since intercultural and interracial contact began And with this profound new study, she explores its old limits and new possibilities from women passing as men and able bodied persons passing as disabled to black classics professors passing as JewishEverybody passes Not just racial minorities As Marcia Alesan Dawkins explains, passing has been occurring for millennia, since intercultural and interracial contact began And with this profound new study, she explores its old limits and new possibilities from women passing as men and able bodied persons passing as disabled to black classics professors passing as Jewish and white supremacists passing as white.Already hailed as a pioneering work in the study of race and culture, Clearly Invisible offers powerful testimony to the fact that individual identities are never fully self determined and that race is far a matter of sociology than of biology.

    One thought on “Clearly Invisible: Racial Passing and the Color of Cultural Identity”

    1. Marcia Dawkins wrote a very informative book that touches on the global issue of passing.A well researched collection that draws parallels on issues of identity and why people choose to assimilate.This book would be a very good guide for any class that focuses on race and cultural identity.Dr Dawkins brings a fresh perspective on a topic that is mostly left hanging.Clearly invisible is a much needed guide in a world that's become more polarized in this modern day and age.I would advise a copy of [...]

    2. Obviously I didn't finish this (is that ever the case with scholarly stuff you get for specific research, and is that ever the case with ILLs?), but what I did read was somewhat interesting. It was less exciting than I hoped, because it didn't provide me with all that much for my research, but I found it intriguing nonetheless and would have wanted to read more had I had time.

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