Wings on My Sleeve

Wings on My Sleeve Eric Brown went to Germany in on an exchange course and his first experience of the war came when the Gestapo arrested him not knowing he was an RAF pilot The rest is history He is the only man

  • Title: Wings on My Sleeve
  • Author: EricBrown
  • ISBN: 9780753822098
  • Page: 481
  • Format: Paperback
  • Eric Brown went to Germany in 1939 on an exchange course, and his first experience of the war came when the Gestapo arrested him, not knowing he was an RAF pilot The rest is history He is the only man alive to have flown every major and most minor combat aircraft of the Second World War as well as all the early jets , and has been interviewed by the top Nazis While tesEric Brown went to Germany in 1939 on an exchange course, and his first experience of the war came when the Gestapo arrested him, not knowing he was an RAF pilot The rest is history He is the only man alive to have flown every major and most minor combat aircraft of the Second World War as well as all the early jets , and has been interviewed by the top Nazis While testing the Nazi jets in war stricken Germany, he interviewed among others Hermann Goering and Hanna Reitsch A living legend among aviation enthusiasts, his amazing life story deserves to be told in full from crashing in front of Winston Churchill to unmasking a Neo Nazi ring in the 1950s to his terrifying flights in primitive jets and rockets.

    One thought on “Wings on My Sleeve”

    1. Captain Eric Brown died 21 February 2016 at the age of 97 in Surry, England. Brown was born in Leth, Scotland in 1919. This renewed the interest in his memoir and various biographies about Brown. This memoir was originally published in 1961. It has recently been reprinted but also is now an e-book and audiobook.The book starts in 1939 when Brown was on an exchange course in German from the University of Edinburgh. The Gestapo escorted him from Germany stating the two counties were now at war. Br [...]

    2. This guy has had a life that most can only dream of. Obviously of good breeding and from the right family, Eric Brown becomes a naval aviator during the early days of World War Two and after a brief combat career becomes a test pilot. He is absorbed into the fascinating and intense world of developing aircraft for use in the war and also evaluating captured enemy machines. Later, because of his earlier pre-war experiences in Germany, he becomes involved in the testing and evaluation of surrender [...]

    3. A flying book - and I met the author in May.Already a legend, he went higher in my estimation as I read the book.

    4. Really enjoyed this book, knew quite a bit about him anyway as he is a hero of mine. They really don’t make them like him anymore . Maybe if you aren’t as familiar with aircraft and ww2 as I am you may have to refer to the glossary but I think this is a book aimed at a niche group of people.I do lament though that if he was American , I’m absolutely sure that there would have been a biopic made about him already.

    5. Gripping account of the career of Britain's finest ever pilot. If you like flying, you'll love this book. Even the list of types Eric Winkle Brown flew in his career (more than any other pilot) had me drooling!

    6. Captain Brown was an amazing pilot, test pilot, aeronaut, driver of change and development, but sadly not a great writer.The book starts with a brief reference to his early life and after a brief description of life before the war we are taken into an endless "listing" of his flying experiences.The book left me feeling that Brown was obsessive about, even addicted to flying. Something he admits briefly.Overall it does little to tell us anything about the man and his extraordinary life and person [...]

    7. Was given this as a present and have not read any of his other books. However, I have read his articles in Air International over the years and enjoyed those. Less sure about the TV documentary that this book seems to be tied in with.He is one of the legends of aviation and anything featuring him is worth your time. Quite a life he has led quite a list of planes he has flown quite a story to tell. Not sure he has done it justice in this handy tome you might want to pop in your holiday luggage. I [...]

    8. It is quite clear from this book that Eric (Winkle) Brown had a unique and astonishing career as a test pilot and naval officer. Flying more types of aircraft than anyone else, his great skill and good fortune enabled him to survive in a profession that cost many others their lives. No one can doubt Eric Brown's piloting skills or his courage and he shows great sympathy for, and understanding of, the feelings of both fellow officers and collaborating scientists as well as former enemies. However [...]

    9. A very engaging book and the author writes quite modestly about his incredible accomplishments, including just staying alive where others met their fate. Test flying is every bit as dangerous as it sounds. I found his description of WWII combat very interesting, along with the ongoing assault on the sound barrier just after the war. However, Mr. Brown's primary expertise was in taking off and landing on aircraft carriers so much of the book is devoted to his endeavours in that arena. His claim t [...]

    10. Brown certainly had an eventful career, which makes for an entertaining read. However, the writing would have benefited from a critical examination before publication. Brown uses quite a bit of jargon which is not explained, and uses strange phraseology at times. He also leaves out information that would have been interesting, for example he flew the bizarre BV141, but tells us absolutely nothing about it! It would have been interesting to know the thinking behind it.So well worth reading, but c [...]

    11. This was an interesting account by a British naval pilot about his career in military aviation. I learned about him because he recently passed away (February 21, 2016), and he was a legend among pilots. He holds three Guinness records, for most planes flown, most aircraft carrier takeoffs and most carrier landings (it's not the same number, which isn't normally okay, but, in his case, is a reflection of research he was doing on various types of aircraft!). An enjoyable read, and partly because o [...]

    12. This is my favorite pilot biography or autobiography by a long shot. Eric Brown holds the record for test flying more aircraft than any other pilot. The book begins with Brown flying missions is American made Wildcats off escort carriers in defense of Allied shipping and ends with his impossibly impressive career as England's greatest test pilot. A must read for any aviation history buff. I've read it three times and will read it again someday.

    13. I bought it mainly for the aviation aspects of the author's life. I feel the few mentions of family matters should have been expanded on somewhat, or not included; they seem a bit out of place. The writing style, while easy enough to get through, doesn't flow well; some parts come to an abrupt end, where some further clarification or expansion of the implications would have been beneficial.Nevertheless an enjoyable and interesting read.

    14. A book that has tremendous appeal to any serious aviation enthusiast. The narrative style adopted makes it a very quick and easy read, sticking to the key objective of charting Eric Brown’s aviation career and giving quite a lot of detail in the process. It supports my theory that, so far as aviation is concerned, fact is far more exciting than fiction. Brilliant!

    15. What an amazing career, too much for one book really. The inclusion of lots of photographs helped bring it all to life, but there was a bit too much repetition of some statements that could have been cut to make room for a glossary of the technical terms. Still, this is the sort of book that starts many conversations, among geeky, history types anyway.

    16. What a career in Naval Aviation (all time master "bagger" in any service!) and flying unusual aircraft as a Test Pilot or in his fascinating task to retrieve captured German Aircraft after end of hostilities in Europe with no instruction.

    17. What strikes me is Eric Brown's modesty, he's done it all and remains unpretentious and understating of his many often astounding achievements.Would you fly an ME 163 just for the hell of it? Well would you punk?

    18. Feel as though I am giving five stars out like water at the moment. This is a special book for me. Not only is it a great read at a great pace, the Mrs got a signed copy for my Birthday. Winkle is 96, still going strong and a client at my wife's firm. Don't make chaps like him any more.

    19. The biography of the most celebrated test pilot in history. He only passed away recently, in February 2016. Light yet fascinating reading, this is the stuff boy's adventures are made of, but all of it is real.

    20. A clearly written account of a fascinating life. So many amazing things are lain out in simple, matter-of-fact language, that one would think they happen all of the time.

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