Cruelty and Civilization: The Roman Games

Cruelty and Civilization The Roman Games From gladiatorial combats to beast fights to stylized executions the ancient Romans killed humans animals in the arena with efficiency ingenuity delectation in astonishing numbers Who were these vic

  • Title: Cruelty and Civilization: The Roman Games
  • Author: Roland Auguet
  • ISBN: 9780760709276
  • Page: 254
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From gladiatorial combats to beast fights to stylized executions, the ancient Romans killed humans animals in the arena with efficiency, ingenuity delectation in astonishing numbers Who were these victims, why were they killed in such brutal spectacular ways how did the Romans dispose of the corpses carcasses Combining ancient evidencFrom gladiatorial combats to beast fights to stylized executions, the ancient Romans killed humans animals in the arena with efficiency, ingenuity delectation in astonishing numbers Who were these victims, why were they killed in such brutal spectacular ways how did the Romans dispose of the corpses carcasses Combining ancient evidence, current scholarship crosscultural comparisons, this insightful study examines Rome s blood stained legacy, discussing such issues as attitudes toward life, death afterlife, raising fundamental questions about the role of ritualized violence in society.

    One thought on “Cruelty and Civilization: The Roman Games”

    1. Lots of great information about gladiatorial and arena games enjoyed by the ancient Romans. If you've watched the show Spartacus or the movie Gladiator, well, the reality was much worse. Especially for the animals. Entire populations and species were wiped out to feed the beast that was the Roman Empires gaming system or shock and awe. It was kind of like this:This one made me tear up a few times at the shear brutality and callousness that humans showed towards animals. I could care less if peop [...]

    2. Institutionalized violence seems to be part and parcel of civilized society. The Romans were among the most sophisticated in linking violence to art and entertainment.This book makes one reflect about our own culture. Unlike the Romans, unlike, indeed, our own culture of only a century ago, we do not publicly show juridical violence. We hide it. We do, however, offer the public violence in many forms. Some are authentic, such as American football or boxing. Some are simulated, such as in cinema, [...]

    3. Deep down, I think that most of us already know the answer that this study aims to provide. The reason that the citizens of Imperial Rome watched gladiatorial combats because they enjoyed them. But Auguet provides the context, attempting to reconstruct the necessary mindset and reveal the social, political and economic factors involved. In this, he displays a broad grasp of the available source material, both literary and archaeological, and a prose style that is lucid where necessary, poetic wh [...]

    4. Read this and then watch Gladiator and Spartacus. Really good insightful and detailed about the Roman games, gladiators, chariot races, animal and aquatic games throughout Roman history. Commodus, the emperor of the film Gladiator, is mentioned several times and was indeed a historical figure who participated as combatant in his own games, sometimes clubbing to death wounded veterans and amputees. The cruelty and flourishing industry of it all and the origins of it all in pre-Roman Etruscan fune [...]

    5. A midsize overview of Roman state sponsered entertainment. Gladiatory combat, chariot races and my personal favorite feeding Christians to the lions. Seriously there is no new material here.

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