Renaissance People: Lives that Shaped the Modern Age

Renaissance People Lives that Shaped the Modern Age The Renaissance burst forth in all its glory around and spread throughout Europe This period of great creativity and productivity in the arts and sciences is illuminated in this book through the

  • Title: Renaissance People: Lives that Shaped the Modern Age
  • Author: Robert C. Davis Beth Lindsmith
  • ISBN: 9781606060780
  • Page: 158
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Renaissance burst forth in all its glory around 1500 and spread throughout Europe This period of great creativity and productivity in the arts and sciences is illuminated in this book through the lives of than ninety of its illustrious intellectuals, artists, literary figures, scientists, and rulers Included are such major figures as Lorenzo and Catherine de MeThe Renaissance burst forth in all its glory around 1500 and spread throughout Europe This period of great creativity and productivity in the arts and sciences is illuminated in this book through the lives of than ninety of its illustrious intellectuals, artists, literary figures, scientists, and rulers Included are such major figures as Lorenzo and Catherine de Medici, Leonardo da Vinci, Charles V, Luther, Columbus, Copernicus, and St Teresa of vila, as well as lesser known characters such as Antonio Rinaldeschi, gambler and blasphemer Louise Lab , the jousting poetess Dick Tarlton, the queen s comedian Veronica Franco, courtesan and wordsmith and Catena, rustler, robber, and bandit chief Each section in this volume marks a chronological stage in Europe s rebirth, tying the period s intellectual currents to its political and social concerns and setting the context for the individual biographies.

    One thought on “Renaissance People: Lives that Shaped the Modern Age”

    1. Davis and Lindsmith have posted in the pages of this book 94 biographies of various personalities from the Renaissance, one short of the 95 theses that Martin Luther, one of their chosen personalities, posted on the door of the All Saints’ Church in Wittenberg on the 31st of October in 1917.If not as momentous as Luther’s theses, these lives are certainly very entertaining to read. More readable than wiki entries, beautifully and aptly illustrated, they offer a perfect captivating pastime to [...]

    2. Brilliant breakfast treat for weeks- one chapter, one life. Learned so much about so many fascinating human beings I had or had never heard of! Thank you to the authors!

    3. Very basic information, but enjoyable. Each person was its own little chapter. It's a good springboard book, almost textbooky, for people who want a basic overview of the era. I didn't read all of it, just the parts that interested me. Overall, ok for a casual reader, but I think this is probably geared more toward a college history course.

    4. Picked up in a sale on a whim because I liked the pictures, this is a collection of entertainingly-written, nicely illustrated 2-page biographies, well produced on decent paper. Simplistic? Of course - it's an introductory overview, designed to spark an interest, with suggestions for further reading on each entry included towards the back. But it's a good one. In trying to spark an interest it succeeds admirably - intriguing illustrations catch the eye while flipping through, and entries are wri [...]

    5. Great short biographies of people of note from this age. A good read to acquaint yourself with important names before delving into the history of the Renaissance.

    6. Too many people for one book because it summarizes the information to the point of becoming a blur. The Catherine de Medici story does not even mention Mary I (who Medici forced to return to her native land when Francois died, making Medici regent) and that's when I lost interest.

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