Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession

Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education Liberal Learning for the Profession Business is the largest undergraduate major in the United States and still growing This reality along with the immense power of the business sector and its significance for national and global well b

  • Title: Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession
  • Author: Anne Colby Thomas Ehrlich William M. Sullivan Jonathan R. Dolle Lee S. Shulman
  • ISBN: 9781118038710
  • Page: 487
  • Format: ebook
  • Business is the largest undergraduate major in the United States and still growing This reality, along with the immense power of the business sector and its significance for national and global well being, makes quality education critical not only for the students themselves but also for the public good The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching s national sBusiness is the largest undergraduate major in the United States and still growing This reality, along with the immense power of the business sector and its significance for national and global well being, makes quality education critical not only for the students themselves but also for the public good The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching s national study of undergraduate business education found that most undergraduate programs are too narrow, failing to challenge students to question assumptions, think creatively, or understand the place of business in larger institutional contexts Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education examines these limitations and describes the efforts of a diverse set of institutions to address them by integrating the best elements of liberal arts learning with business curriculum to help students develop wise, ethically grounded professional judgment.

    One thought on “Rethinking Undergraduate Business Education: Liberal Learning for the Profession”

    1. For the most part, I agree with the central premise of the book and most of the suggestions to incorporate the liberal arts into business education. The writing is a bit repetitive like most social science writing (outside of economics). The biggest problem with the book is that the authors don't seem to fully appreciate the gains from trade and how free markets create value for society. The price system and profit-maximization is how we can serve others and create value for total strangers.

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