Le Concept De Nature

Le Concept De Nature This book a development of his Tarner Lectures given in is one of Alfred North Whiteheads most important contributions to natural philosophy His first concern is with the fundamental problems o

  • Title: Le Concept De Nature
  • Author: Alfred North Whitehead
  • ISBN: 9782711613571
  • Page: 153
  • Format: None
  • This book, a development of his Tarner Lectures given in 1919, is one of Alfred North Whiteheads most important contributions to natural philosophy His first concern is with the fundamental problems of substance, space, and time and the most interesting part of his discussion is, perhaps, his criticism of Einsteins method of interpreting results, and the alternative deveThis book, a development of his Tarner Lectures given in 1919, is one of Alfred North Whiteheads most important contributions to natural philosophy His first concern is with the fundamental problems of substance, space, and time and the most interesting part of his discussion is, perhaps, his criticism of Einsteins method of interpreting results, and the alternative development of his own well known theory of the four dimensional Space Time manifold Although this book was first published over a generation ago, and the characteristic approach of philosophers to the problems of nature has changed considerably in the intervening period, The Concept of Nature has never ceased to deserve their careful attention When the book first appeared, A E Taylor, writing in Mind, said The Concept of Nature is a great contribution to Naturphilosophie, far the finest contribution, in my own judgement, yet made by any one man J E McTaggart in The Cambridge Review called it one of the most valuable books on the relation of philosophy and science which has appeared for many years, adding I am sure the study of this book will benefit metaphysicians I venture to believe that it will benefit men of science.

    One thought on “Le Concept De Nature”

    1. Whitehead has come up as an influence on both philosophers/theorists (Latour, Bennett, DeLanda, Deleuze/Guattari) and theologians that I've been interested in recently. This was a nice (free -- thanks Project Gutenberg!) intro, though even for me it got a little overly dedicated in its exploration of definitions. It's worth riding it out, in part because now I feel ready to dive into some other works of his.I suppose it helps that I was already pretty convinced that we're better off thinking of [...]

    2. Anybody expecting to read this book for some kind of metaphysical buzz will be disappointed. Whitehead's approach is highly technical involving four dimensional geometry, event particles, "sigma primes" and a host of other self defined technical terms. Among these terms (ie a "duration") just when I felt I had grasped his meaning I came upon what to me was an inconsistency. Since it is ANW I can only conclude I hadn't grasped his meaning in the first place. He definitely pushes against the tende [...]

    3. Interesting exposition but could be more plainly writtenWhiteheads thesis in this book is outlines a structure for understanding nature in a novel way that, once you penetrate the writing has coherence. It won't give you a modern view but would make interesting reading for anyone interested in metaphysics. The only area lacking is that his symbolism is hard to follow and his coinage of new words unnecessary. Otherwise a pleasant challenge to read.

    4. A marvelous first step in Whitehead's overhaul of our picture of the world. It lacks the completeness of process and reality, yet many of his ideas, still in their fetal stages here, are clearer and more graspable. Not for the faint-of-heart; if you like physics or math, this is a good book for you.

    5. Based on a series of lectures in 1919 at Trinity College regarding discussions on the relations between time, space, and logical perceptionActually a 4.5 read, occasional research to be done during its duration, very interesting and knowledge increasing

    6. For those who are native natural scientists and/or have an interest in natural philosophy, this book is a must read. It also forms some sort of bridge towards his magnum opus, which is really useful considering the way in which Process and Reality is written.

    7. I was tipped off to Whitehead in Jed Perl's New Art City, where Fairfield Porter and Donald Judd were each apparently influenced by him. Whitehead's discussions about nature, time, space, motion & objects are highly technical - energizing my studio practice.

    8. Dense, difficult, and challengingBut well worth the effort for its insights into nature, our perception of it, and how we might think about nature without bifurcating it.

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