Crossroads: Tales of the Southern Literary Fantastic

Crossroads Tales of the Southern Literary Fantastic As William Faulkner once observed The past isn t dead It isn t even past And the past of the American South lives on in a long literary tradition where fantasy and reality blur It is evident in the w

  • Title: Crossroads: Tales of the Southern Literary Fantastic
  • Author: F. Brett Cox Brett Cox Andy Duncan
  • ISBN: 9780765308139
  • Page: 144
  • Format: Hardcover
  • As William Faulkner once observed, The past isn t dead It isn t even past And the past of the American South lives on in a long literary tradition where fantasy and reality blur It is evident in the writing of giants such as Faulkner himself, Flannery O Connor, Mark Twain, Edgar Allan Poe, Manly Wade Wellman, Truman Capote, Alice Walker, and many others Steeped in thAs William Faulkner once observed, The past isn t dead It isn t even past And the past of the American South lives on in a long literary tradition where fantasy and reality blur It is evident in the writing of giants such as Faulkner himself, Flannery O Connor, Mark Twain, Edgar Allan Poe, Manly Wade Wellman, Truman Capote, Alice Walker, and many others Steeped in this tradition and proud to be its inheritors, storytellers and editors F Brett Cox and Andy Duncan have gathered together stories of the unseen and magical American South by some of the most brilliantly talented Southern writers of our time From darkly imagined, powerful tales by Bret Lott, Lynn Pitts, Kalanu ya Salaam, Brad Watson, and Don Webb to a deeply affecting and sensual story by Honor e Fanonne Jeffers, to atmospheric works by Richard Butner, James L Cambias, and Jack McDevitt, to wildly funny stories by Scott Edelman and Michael Swanwick, these original fictions will delight readers who appreciate the unique wealth and breadth of the Southern literary tradition and its natural affinity for the fantastic With the addition of wonderful reprinted stories by Michael Bishop, Fred Chappell, Andy Duncan, John Kessel, Kelly Link, Sena Jeter Naslund, Daniel Wallace, and Gene Wolfe, this collection is a crossroads of styles and themes where Southern and Fantastic literary traditions meet.Together these stories paint a wide canvas of the real and mythic South in all its fabulous, terrible, joyous, chaotic uniqueness They are set in all the Southern landscapes of the mind, from the shores of South Carolina to the city of New Orleans, from small town Mississippi to the streets of modern Atlanta, from the ghosts of ante bellum splendor to the shadows of what might be The contributors range from realistic to Gothic, from magic realists to satirists What they share in common is the South and the endless stories it inspires.

    One thought on “Crossroads: Tales of the Southern Literary Fantastic”

    1. 2.96 average rounds up (just a tiny bit) to 3 stars. Definitely a higher quality of writing, overall, than found in many genre anthologies.*** A Place of Mojo - Honoree Fanonne Jeffers. Impressive story, really well-written, and I felt like it accurately captured elements of Southern African-American society, just post-slavery. However, it's really not 'fantastic.'**** The Wounded - Richard Butner. Shades of H.P. Lovecraft here, in this tale of a Korean War vet turned photography student, who un [...]

    2. Some of the stories are amateurish (I assume because they were trying to achieve some sort of balance, by age, geography, race, whatever), and several of them are only "fantastic" in the vaguest way and would be perfectly at home in a mundane anthology. Two fanfic stories: one on Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" (not impressive; too much 'oh, get a load of this, this is gonna be sooooo creepy, you won't believe it,' so that when it's finally revealed, though it's deeply creepy, it's still anticlima [...]

    3. A good collection, with the contributions by Wolfe ("Houston, 1943"), Kessel ("Every Angel is Terrifying"), and Jeffers ("A Plate of Mojo") particularly effective. Not all of the tales have a notably regional flavour: among these is McDowell's "Making Faces", a tedious catalogue of teen culture combined with teen horror movie plot which could be taking place anywhere in the US--easily the nadir of the book.

    4. Perfect name for this book, the numinous southernness of "the crossroads." Blues, the devil, goth rural life, weirdness. The first story in the book "Plate of Mojo" by Honoree Fannone Jeffers, was so unique and strong, I had to give the anthology a rest after reading it. It just didn't seem fair to put any other story up against it.

    5. Another book of my To-Be-Read Shelf. Excellent collection--yes, as Catherine says, some stories I liked better than others--but, yes, all here are worth reading. Some are quite beautiful and this is a good exploration of the Southern Literary Fantastic. Only a couple I couldn't quite figure out why they were in the collection. Well done, Andy and Brett.

    6. I had a copy of Crossroads ages ago and lent it out. It didn't return so I finally obtained another copy and am still enamored with this collection. If you want to borrow it, LMK - you'll just need to sign a few dozen contracts and leave me your car keys in return.

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