American Anthrax: Fear, Crime, and the Investigation of the Nation's Deadliest Bioterror Attack

American Anthrax Fear Crime and the Investigation of the Nation s Deadliest Bioterror Attack From Jeanne Guillemin one of the world s leading experts on anthrax and bioterrorism the definitive account of the anthrax investigationIt was the most complex case in FBI history In what became a s

  • Title: American Anthrax: Fear, Crime, and the Investigation of the Nation's Deadliest Bioterror Attack
  • Author: Jeanne Guillemin
  • ISBN: 9780805091045
  • Page: 422
  • Format: Hardcover
  • From Jeanne Guillemin, one of the world s leading experts on anthrax and bioterrorism, the definitive account of the anthrax investigationIt was the most complex case in FBI history In what became a seven year investigation that began shortly after 9 11 with America reeling from the terror attacks of al Qaeda virulent anthrax spores sent through the mail killed Bob StevenFrom Jeanne Guillemin, one of the world s leading experts on anthrax and bioterrorism, the definitive account of the anthrax investigationIt was the most complex case in FBI history In what became a seven year investigation that began shortly after 9 11 with America reeling from the terror attacks of al Qaeda virulent anthrax spores sent through the mail killed Bob Stevens, a Florida tabloid photo editor His death and, days later, the discovery in New York and Washington, D.C of letters filled with anthrax sent shock waves through the nation Federal agencies were blindsided by the attacks, which eventually killed five people Taken off guard, the FBI struggled to combine on the ground criminal investigation with progress in advanced bioforensic analyses of the letters contents.While the criminal eluded justice, disinformation swirled around the letters, erroneously linking them to Iraq s WMD threat and foreign bioterrorism Without oversight, billions were lavished on biomedical defenses against anthrax and other exotic diseases Worst of all, faith in federal justice faltered.American Anthrax is a gripping tale of terror, intrigue, madness, and cover up.

    One thought on “American Anthrax: Fear, Crime, and the Investigation of the Nation's Deadliest Bioterror Attack”

    1. I’m a little dream-self short and stout.I’m the other half of Bruce – when he lets me out.When I get all steamed up, I don’t pout.I push Bruce aside, then I’m free to run about!With American Anthrax, Jeanne Guillemin examines the deadliest biological attack in U.S. history as a virulent strain of the Anthrax virus was seeded into letters mailed to major media outlets and U.S. government offices. The investigative portions of this book are riveting, and Guillemin plays master detective [...]

    2. An an interesting book that explores the who-done-it and why it took so long to figure it out of the just after 9/11 anthrax attack. Unfortunately, I fear that our country will never really learn that our enemy is not The Other. People very much like ourselves can be criminals too. While the likely anthrax murderer never went to trial (he committed suicide shortly before he was to be arrested) the evidence against him seems convincing. The "like me" aspect of Bruce Ivins was kind of eerie. We bo [...]

    3. Interesting but rather dry The early part of the book (describing the sequence of events as the 2011 anthrax letter attacks unfolded) is reasonably brisk and lively, but the book drags as it goes through the aftermath, culminating in the suicide of the primary suspect. Maybe it's my problem, but I wanted more characters and story, and less data and footnotes. Worth reading, especially for the analysis of the Bush administration's misguided determination to treat the anthrax letters as a foreign [...]

    4. Jeanne Guillemin does a great job in bringing to life not only the investigation of the deadliest bioterrorism attack in United States history, but in emphasizing the factors that more traditional narratives might have missed. From the trials and disappointments of Brentwood Exposed, to the personal dramas of the major players, Jeanne has an even-handed and insightful report of this tragic narrative.

    5. I found the first 100 pages of the book that described the initial attacks and immediate aftermath gripping, but, in what is probably a sad parallel to what happened after the attacks, I think the end of the book got bogged down trying to encapsulate all the different aspects of the story into something cohesive and readable, and I lost interest.

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