First Stop in the New World

First Stop in the New World The definitive book on Mexico City a vibrant seductive and paradoxical metropolis the second biggest city in the world and a vision of our urban future First Stop in the New World is a street level

  • Title: First Stop in the New World
  • Author: David Lida
  • ISBN: 1594483787
  • Page: 459
  • Format: Paperback
  • The definitive book on Mexico City a vibrant, seductive, and paradoxical metropolis the second biggest city in the world, and a vision of our urban future.First Stop in the New World is a street level panorama of Mexico City, the largest metropolis in the western hemisphere and the cultural capital of the Spanish speaking world Journalist David Lida expertly captures theThe definitive book on Mexico City a vibrant, seductive, and paradoxical metropolis the second biggest city in the world, and a vision of our urban future.First Stop in the New World is a street level panorama of Mexico City, the largest metropolis in the western hemisphere and the cultural capital of the Spanish speaking world Journalist David Lida expertly captures the kaleidoscopic nature of life in a city defined by pleasure and danger, ecstatic joy and appalling tragedy hanging in limbo between the developed and underdeveloped worlds With this literary journalist account, he establishes himself as the ultimate chronicler of this bustling megalopolis at a key moment in its and our history.

    One thought on “First Stop in the New World”

    1. I'm obsessed with Mexico, again. This comes up every few years. This time it was because I just finished teaching a class at Leader where 3 of the clients were from Mexico. It's like every time I have anything to do with anything from Mexico, I get hooked again.Anyway, the author is a journalist who's lived in Mexico City for a long time. Although obviously I don't live in Mexico and can't assess whether the things he says are true or not, they have the ring of truth, like if I was writing about [...]

    2. Great insight to the culture and history! Seriously I have no idea why other people would rate it less than 5!

    3. This is an easy travel book to read. The author’s antidotes are funny, and I learned all sorts of things (no driving test in Mexico, plus no one likes to admit they don’t know, or say no, which means you have to interpret nuances in body language and speech). I was interested in the section on sexuality and the way Mexicans play out gender stereotypes to their own detriment (the pious/virginal mother takes such good care of her son that he believes only a woman who doesn’t enjoy sex is mar [...]

    4. 3.5 stars! I travel to Mexico City frequently for work, and Lida accurately captures the city, from its grittiness to its loveliness. The book is a both a great primer on Mexico City for first time visitors and fun revisiting of the highlights for old-timers. However, the chapters were uneven in terms of their quality, insight, and length, and the book often felt more like a compilation of Lida's numerous articles than a coherent narrative. More structure and an overarching narrative arc would h [...]

    5. Amazing insight into Mexico City, though it could have used a bit better editing to avoid some repetition (sometimes within a few pages, reintroducing a specific word of location as if it was the first time the second, or even third time around). That said, ESSENTIAL reading if you're gong to visit the DF, from the history, to the culture, but especially the stories behind the people who make it tick. Highly recommended.

    6. very readable set of scenes/sketches of life in Mexico City by an American expat, with a good mixture of history/street life/contemporary culture/politics. Amounts to a night of good conversation with someone who knows his city well. i found Lida very slightly intrusive -- he just has his own take on the world that was a little sour for me, but he's upfront about it. This book is not a great advertisement for Mexico City, but it is a pretty good book.

    7. From my limited experience I found most of what the author of this book said to be spot on. I enjoyed learning more about this dynamic city and the people who inhabit it. I also enjoyed learning more about Santa Fe and why thing here in Mexico are the way they are. I did skip/skim a few chapters such as Sex Capital and The Last Cabaret. Over all a good and informative read.

    8. This was a great counter-balance to the academic books I read about Mexican economics, politics, etc. It's the real life, on-the-ground view of life in Mexico City. Reads like a fiction book and covers about every topic you'd ask about.

    9. A tour of a complex city. Even with all the details, you're left with a sense that it has even more layers than he describes.

    10. A great collection of vignettes and essays about Mexico City. Made for fun reading while actually in the DF.

    11. Entertaining enough for Mexico City-philes like myself but not compelling enough for me to recommend it to others unless you have some personal interest in the land of chilangos.

    12. Great montage of literary snapshots of Mexico City. Highly recommended for anyone with ganas to explore Mexico City.

    13. There is a lot of fun and sad material here. After reading this book, despite all the bad things, I really want to see this grandiose city.

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