A Life in Letters

A Life in Letters From his teenage years in provincial Russia to his premature death in Anton Chekhov wrote thousands of letters to a wide range of correspondents This fascinating new selection tells Chekhov s st

  • Title: A Life in Letters
  • Author: Anton Chekhov Rosamund Bartlett Anthony Phillips
  • ISBN: 9780140449228
  • Page: 322
  • Format: Paperback
  • From his teenage years in provincial Russia to his premature death in 1904, Anton Chekhov wrote thousands of letters to a wide range of correspondents This fascinating new selection tells Chekhov s story as a man and a writer through affectionate bulletins to his family, insightful discussions of literature with publishers and theater directors, and tender love letters toFrom his teenage years in provincial Russia to his premature death in 1904, Anton Chekhov wrote thousands of letters to a wide range of correspondents This fascinating new selection tells Chekhov s story as a man and a writer through affectionate bulletins to his family, insightful discussions of literature with publishers and theater directors, and tender love letters to his actress wife Vividly evoking landscapes, people, and his daily life, the letters offer revealing glimpses into Chekhov s preoccupations the onset of tuberculosis, his dual careers as doctor and writer, and his ambivalence about his growing reputation as Russia s foremost playwright and author This volume takes us inside the mind of one of the world s greatest writers, and the character that emerges from these pages is resilient, generous, charming, and life enhancing.

    One thought on “A Life in Letters”

    1. “You complain that my characters are gloomy. Alas, this is not my fault! They come out like that without my necessarily wanting them to, and when I am writing I don’t feel as though I am writing gloomily. In any case, I’m always in a good mood when I’m writing. It is a well-documented fact that pessimists and melancholics always write in a very upbeat way, whereas cheerful writers generally manage to depress their readers. My temperament is inclined to be cheerful; at least for the first [...]

    2. A great read for anyone who enjoys the voyeuristic qualities of reading someone else's correspondence. Chekhov's letters to his wife are incredibly touching and wonderful. It's also for those who miss the fine art of letter writing, when people took the time to sit down, share their observations on pen and paper and strolled to the local post office to post them!

    3. Humane, witty, unpretentious, adventurous, reflective: an admirable man, brought to life through the treasure of his letters. A book to spend time with and return to.

    4. I really drew out reading the end, because it was like I had been following a friend's letters and as (kind of obvious spoiler) the author reaches the end of his life, it was like we had no chance to say goodbye.What is interesting is how his writing style changes depending on the recipient. When he writes to his sister, it's extremely perfunctory (get me this, check on that, my love to mama), and then when he writes to his wife it was very emotional (miss you, don't be mad, write me) but when h [...]

    5. Rosamund Bartlett who edited these letters and also translated them with Anthony PhillipsIS MY LECTURERat the Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney ,for the series of 4 lectures on Art in Imperial Russia LUCKY CAN YOU GET?????????????????????????????????She lectures at the University of Durham.The reason we are getting a 3 week break between lecture 2 and lecture 3 is because Rosamund is getting married to a fellow who works at the ABCiee Australian Broadcasting Commission.I talked to them after the first [...]

    6. I read this expecting to gain more insight on Chekhov's views on writing. And some of that is available in these letters, but very little. What was so delightful is how clear Chekhov writes and what a superb story teller he is, even in his correspondence. This is also a window into Russian society of the time with glimpses of the rural life in particular. It was also encouraging to see such a renowned author having to borrow so often and so frequently throughout his career -- even after he was a [...]

    7. If you love Chekhov's stories and/or plays this book will break your heart. He only lived until age 44, and despite having active TB, accomplished so much in his short life. A practicing physician, Chekhov wrote literature on the side. He also built three schools for the poor and quietly donated to those in need. His correspondence with his publisher shows the development of the young writer into a literary lion. His love letters to Olga are priceless, and his correspondence to his concerned fam [...]

    8. In the time I took reading this book, I could have incubated a human baby. It was interesting but it definitely became an exercise in willfulness.

    9. This made me wonder how many vivid characters and roles one plays in a life. Each letter flows into a role entirely different from the other and they beautifully fit in.One of the best reads.

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