Selected Letters, 1940-1985

Selected Letters In addition to his acknowledged position as one of Britain s most important poets of the post World War II era Philip Larkin was unquestionably one of the last great letter writers There are over sev

  • Title: Selected Letters, 1940-1985
  • Author: Philip Larkin Anthony Thwaite
  • ISBN: 9780571170487
  • Page: 225
  • Format: Paperback
  • In addition to his acknowledged position as one of Britain s most important poets of the post World War II era, Philip Larkin was unquestionably one of the last great letter writers There are over seven hundred letters in this impressive collection, dating from Larkin s late teens until close to his death at the age of sixty three in 1985 Early letters to school friends,In addition to his acknowledged position as one of Britain s most important poets of the post World War II era, Philip Larkin was unquestionably one of the last great letter writers There are over seven hundred letters in this impressive collection, dating from Larkin s late teens until close to his death at the age of sixty three in 1985 Early letters to school friends, including the writer Kingsley Amis, form a portrait of the young artist, full of jazz, literature, and obscenities Later correspondents include the novelist Barbara Pym whose fictional portraits of genteel English country life Larkin so admired , Robert Conquest, Andrew Motion, and Julian Barnes.In his Introduction, Anthony Thwaite writes What is remarkable, for all the masks he put on, is how consistently Larkin emerges, whoever he is writing to The letters are an informal record of the lonely, gregarious intolerant, compassionate, eloquent, foul mouthed, harsh and humorous Philip Larkin, who was not only one of the finest poets of our time but also a compulsive and entertaining letter writer.

    One thought on “Selected Letters, 1940-1985”

    1. I love the once admired and then reviled people. They reveal so much about the human condition and the burden of hope that we all place in them to elevate us out of the meanest locales of spirit that our humanity dwells. Phillip Larkin is one great example, a self depreciating to the point of self-loathing, English poet who was a towering giant in the years following the Second World War. Even years later following his death in 1979 he appeared high on the list of important post modern literary [...]

    2. Reading other people’s letters is one of my guilty pleasures. I first read this selection of Philip Larkin’s letters in 1993, writing to a friend shortly after I’d begun: ‘So far, the guy seems a bit of a prat.’ But I ended up enjoying the book immensely, Larkin’s prattish moments notwithstanding.Be warned, there is plenty of misogyny, racism, xenophobia, Toryism and jazz in these letters, but there are also plenty of affectionate letters. And there are also many humorous moments. Li [...]

    3. I went to sleep reading these letters for several months. They are at moments hilarious, sometimes sad, sometimes interesting because of famous correspondents, but overall appealing because of Larkin's character.Since I live in Montenegro, his works are almost nowhere to be found. I stumbled upon it in a cafe and the owner gave it to me, seeing how interested I was. I don't think you need to love his poetry to be able to enjoy this collection of letters.

    4. If L lived to this age, and if he cared to open a Twitter account just for the sake of insulting and offending anyone/anything displeases him, the landscape of the Internet would have been greatly improved. Hardly anyone could match his wisdom, grumpiness and humour.

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