When the Garden Was Eden: Clyde, the Captain, Dollar Bill, and the Glory Days of the New York Knicks

When the Garden Was Eden Clyde the Captain Dollar Bill and the Glory Days of the New York Knicks In the tradition of The Boys of Summer and The Bronx Is Burning New York Times sports columnist Harvey Araton delivers a fascinating look at the s New York Knicks part autobiography part sports

  • Title: When the Garden Was Eden: Clyde, the Captain, Dollar Bill, and the Glory Days of the New York Knicks
  • Author: Harvey Araton
  • ISBN: 9780061956232
  • Page: 365
  • Format: Hardcover
  • In the tradition of The Boys of Summer and The Bronx Is Burning, New York Times sports columnist Harvey Araton delivers a fascinating look at the 1970s New York Knicks part autobiography, part sports history, part epic, set against the tumultuous era when Walt Frazier, Willis Reed, and Bill Bradley reigned supreme in the world of basketball Perfect for readers of Jeff PeaIn the tradition of The Boys of Summer and The Bronx Is Burning, New York Times sports columnist Harvey Araton delivers a fascinating look at the 1970s New York Knicks part autobiography, part sports history, part epic, set against the tumultuous era when Walt Frazier, Willis Reed, and Bill Bradley reigned supreme in the world of basketball Perfect for readers of Jeff Pearlman s The Bad Guys Won , Peter Richmond s Badasses, and Pat Williams s Coach Wooden, Araton s revealing story of the Knicks heyday is far than a review of one of basketball s greatest teams inspiring story it is, at heart, a stirring recreation of a time and place when the NBA championships defined the national dream.

    One thought on “When the Garden Was Eden: Clyde, the Captain, Dollar Bill, and the Glory Days of the New York Knicks”

    1. The New York Knickerbockers, or Knicks (named after the fictional narrator in Washington Irving's satirical novel "Knickerbocker's History of New York"), one of the original teams of the National Basketball Association (NBA), has been in continuous existence since 1946. The early Knicks teams were competitive, playing in three consecutive NBA Finals from 1951-1953, but lost each series to a superior foe. The Knicks then sunk into mediocrity from the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s, playing before spa [...]

    2. The championship Knicks teams were before my time but this book conveyed what great teams they were and how the city fell in love with them during their championship runs.

    3. Charlie CraveiroMany people claim that they are fans of the famous New York Knickerbockers, but are they really? Are you a real Knicks fan or are you just part of Linsanity, or maybe just a fan of Carmelo Anthony who is arguably the best scorer in the N.B.A. This is a question that many would not like to answer honestly. I feel that if you are a real fan of the New York Knickerbockers than you should know the history of the franchise. So if you believe that you are or would like to be a real Kni [...]

    4. This book is strictly for Knicks fans and great for "Old Knicks" fans. Araton profiles the great Knick teams of the early 1970s with insight and an obvious love for a team that not only won, but did so in a way that honored an approach to sports that isn't very often on display in modern basketball. A look at the players displayed on the cover makes one obvious impression, these were all very intelligent and educated players. They all graduated college and many went on to successful post-playing [...]

    5. Long-time fans of NY basketball will enjoy this trip down memory lane to the era of the great Knicks' teams of the late 60's and early 70's. Back to the times when The Captain, Clyde and Dollar Bill played basketball in the old Garden the way it was meant to be played. Back to a time when salaries of NBA players were modest and when professional basketball was still a team sport.Perhaps no other team (at least by NY standards) epitomized the concept of "team ball" more than these Knicks did. And [...]

    6. There was a lot of great material in this book and a lot of not so great material. Unfortunately, almost all of the great material was in the first half, culminating in the Knicks' first championship. If the book had ended at page 183 (with the remaining content perhaps summed up in an epilogue), it would have been a great read that I could wholeheartedly recommend. Instead, it was half a great read and half a frustrating read. The author sums up the second championship as "unremarkable indeed," [...]

    7. Well, I gave this one a good try, but 80 pages in, I really just have one word for it: insider's. This is an insider's book. I heard mention of this somewhere during March Madness and thought I'd give it a try. I'll read just about anything that gets a strong recommendation! But the book just presumes that you know enough about the general history of the Knicks during the late 1960's and early 1970's that the broad strokes are already familiar. If that's the case, I'm sure this is absolutely the [...]

    8. A great book giving great insight into my favorite team. I wish I could have been alive to witness this team to see them win their two championships. It was fascinating to see how all the different personalities came together to form one unit. I liked all the profiles of the players, coaches, and fans. The way they played is the way basketball is supposed to be played. The only chapter I didn't like is the one on Earl Monore because it seemed the whole thing was about how much he regretted leavi [...]

    9. I absolutely loved this book. The way that Mr. Araton tells these stories and describes these very interesting individual characters reminds me of the way my father made sports come alive for me as a kid through his stories. His framing of basketball as a uniting force for New Yorkers and the players during a time of great political and racial stress is a great narrative and one that highlights the importance of sports in our cultural landscape. He also discusses the shifts in the way the game w [...]

    10. When the Garden Was Eden: Clyde, the Captain, Dollar Bill, and the Glory Days of the New York Knicksby Harvey Araton (Harper 2011)(796+/-) is a puff piece reminiscing about and glorifying the New York Knicks NBA championship teams of the early 1970's. Those teams featured Willis Reed, Walt Frazier, Earl Monroe, Dave Debusscher, Bill Bradley, and Phil Jackson, and I grew up watching them play the Philadelphia 76ers, the Boston Celtics, and the LA Lakers on a black and white tv on Sunday afternoon [...]

    11. If you like the New York Knicks, this is a must-read. Araton uses his contacts from years of sports reporting, plus his memories of being a kid at MSG, to create a history I am unfortunately too young to have lived. Filled with bios of famous Knicks from the 70s, "When the Garden Was Eden" really helped me understand the players and people my dad has praised all of his life. It made that nostalgia I feel for "real basketball" truly tangible.

    12. Some great details for hardcore hoops/Knicks fans, but jarring sense of hagiography, effectively proving the biggest criticism levied against this team, that it's been overrated by virtue of its market. To its credit, great discussion of the discontents of success, especially in the case of Earl Monroe. Also includes a fascinating/offputting off-the-record quote from Debuscherre, calling the Sprewell/LJ team "assholes".

    13. This book teaches an important lesson: sports writers who aspire to be novelists should have domineering editors. This book did not result from such a collaboration and this comes across as a boring uncle's reminiscings. Instead of sharing a golden era, this book's stultifying grammar and non-rules-based syntax convey a cranky old person's half told story about a time when something something happened. (read: 2013)

    14. I knew little about those Old Knick teams of the early 70s, but after reading Araton's account I felt like I was in the Garden during that famous run. He not only captures the heart of those teams and the cultural milieu of New York at that time, but reveals the players in such a real and intimate way that I couldn't help but become a devoted fan 40 years after these men stole the Apple's heart. Excellent read.

    15. One of the most fun books I've read this year. I finished it on a subway in NYC, having just dropped someone of at MSG for a train trip, so the legends were particularly vibrant. Just the backstory (and aftermath) on Earl Monroe and the trade was worth the entire book.I'm gifting this book forward to a friend who loves the Knicks and loves NYC, but has since moved away. We should all grasp that sports heroism from when we were kids. This book brought it all back to me.

    16. If you're a fan of that era of New York Knicks, it's so much fun; a good balance of what got them there and what was there. If not you might find it a little fanboy as the author is obviously a passionate fan of those Knicks as much as a writer. For me it worked, I was sucked right up in the excitement. For others less so. In any case, the author spent a year or two; and almost his whole life; writing this, for me it was fun to read.

    17. Araton didn't set out to write a book about NY in the 70s, but the through sports lens he really nails what the city was like then. Also a great sports book: What a team the Old Knicks were! Makes the Dolans and the current incarnation of the franchise, by comparison, even more repellent for the legacy they have squandered.

    18. A must read for basketball fans, particularly those (like me) who are devoted to the New York Knicks and have a strong memory of their two championship teams. Itt will be impossible to get through parts of the book without feeling very strong emotions.

    19. Interesting look at the great Knicks teams of the 1970's. Before my time in watching basketball so it was a nice way to gain an appreciation of a very special group of players.

    20. A great read about the quintessential basketball team. I found out a lot more than I ever knew about the men who got me interested in basketball.

    21. This is a must read for those Knicks, (and basketball), fans that can easily recall the names of Clyde, Dollar Bill, and Earl the Pearl. Loved it!

    22. Very good background and description of the two championship teams of the Knicks, backgrounds of all the players, Reed, Frazier, Monroe, Debusschere, Bradley, Jackson, Russell.

    23. sometimes people say about sports books, "you'll like this book even if you don't like sports." why don't you like sports? read whatever you want. who cares.

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