They Have Their Exits: The Best-Selling Escape Memoirs of World War Two

They Have Their Exits The Best Selling Escape Memoirs of World War Two The Author who as a senior member of Mrs Thatcher s Government was tragically assassinated by the IRA had the most distinguished of war records Wounded and taken prisoner in the desperate fighting a

  • Title: They Have Their Exits: The Best-Selling Escape Memoirs of World War Two
  • Author: Airey Neave
  • ISBN: 9781844154630
  • Page: 222
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Author, who as a senior member of Mrs Thatcher s Government was tragically assassinated by the IRA, had the most distinguished of war records Wounded and taken prisoner in the desperate fighting at Calais in 1940, he became a compulsive escaper and the first one of the very few to make a home run from Colditz Castle Thereafter he rejoined the fighting serving in FThe Author, who as a senior member of Mrs Thatcher s Government was tragically assassinated by the IRA, had the most distinguished of war records Wounded and taken prisoner in the desperate fighting at Calais in 1940, he became a compulsive escaper and the first one of the very few to make a home run from Colditz Castle Thereafter he rejoined the fighting serving in France and Holland before becoming a member of the International Military Tribunal at the Nuremburg War Crimes trials There he was to meet the most notorious members of the Nazi hierarchy as they faced justice and, in many cases, death For the quality of its writing and the breadth of its author s experiences, They Have Their Exits is arguably the finest memoir to emerge from the Second World War, and one for which the sobriquet classic seems wholly inadequate.

    One thought on “They Have Their Exits: The Best-Selling Escape Memoirs of World War Two”

    1. A really good memoir of World War Two on how a POW British soldier was able to escape with the help of the French Resistance. Later, Airey Neave got his revenge by serving after the war as a member of the Nuremburg War Crimes Tribunal. A fantastic read.

    2. A world long gone! It's so interesting to get a glimpse into it. We owe them so much.As a story teller what I noticed was that good times are passed over in a sentence such as we spent three comfortable well-fed weeks in the hotel before moving on, while tense moments, such as hiding in a 'safe' house waiting for resistance fighters to help them along the path to freedom, heighten the senses so that a liftime seems to be lived in a minute and the spots on a woman's dress, the texture of an egg, [...]

    3. I'd started this book thinking that it would be primarily about Neave's account of escaping from Colditz. While the escape did comprise the main part of the book, getting out of Colditz turned out to just be the start of the journey. The account is told simply from Neave's viewpoint and makes for an exciting yarn in the "Boy's own" tradition but he's also not much given to introspection or getting into the minds of those around him. It's great fun to read, but I can't see myself wanting to go ba [...]

    4. A great read by a true heroAt the end I was reminded what a loss his death at the hands of low life was. He fought and eventually died serving his country. I thoroughly recommend this book.

    5. Airey Neave is probably best remembered as the Conservative MP killed by an IRA bomb as he drove out of the car park at the Houses of Parliament. But before he moved into politics, Neave had an eventful war. Wounded and captured during the Battle of France in 1940, Neave was interned in a prisoner of war camp in Poland. Almost immediately, he began plotting to escape, successfully breaking out with a partner three months after arriving in the camp. His taste of freedom was sweet but brief, thoug [...]

    6. An interesting detail of a POW experience during WWII. It almost seemed like a real life version of Hogan's Heroes. While the escape narrative was quite engaging, the post escape narrative was almost anticlimactic in comparison to the beginning of the book.

    7. The account of Airey Neave's stay in and escape from Colditz - the first British officer to get home. Fascinating to read.

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