A Field Guide to Earthlings: An Autistic/Asperger View of Neurotypical Behavior

A Field Guide to Earthlings An Autistic Asperger View of Neurotypical Behavior Autistic people often live in a state of anxiety and confusion about the social world running into misunderstandings and other barriers This book unlocks the inner workings of neurotypical behavior

  • Title: A Field Guide to Earthlings: An Autistic/Asperger View of Neurotypical Behavior
  • Author: Ian Ford Stephanie Hamilton
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 443
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • Autistic people often live in a state of anxiety and confusion about the social world, running into misunderstandings and other barriers This book unlocks the inner workings of neurotypical behavior, which can be mysterious to autistics Topics include the nuances of friendship, dating, small talk, interpersonal conflicts, image, learning styles, social communication, comAutistic people often live in a state of anxiety and confusion about the social world, running into misunderstandings and other barriers This book unlocks the inner workings of neurotypical behavior, which can be mysterious to autistics Topics include the nuances of friendship, dating, small talk, interpersonal conflicts, image, learning styles, social communication, common sense, and white lies.Proceeding from root concepts of language and culture through 62 behavior patterns used by neurotypical people, the book reveals how they structure a mental map of the world in symbolic webs of beliefs, how those symbols are used to filter perception, how they build and display their identity, how they compete for power, and how they socialize and develop relationships From the introduction This book reveals psychological patterns of neurotypical humans, from an autistic perspective I wrote it to help you understand them You might read it if you are autistic and have to work harder to understand why people do what they do, or you might read it if you are neurotypical and want to understand an autistic person in your life, or you might read it because you are interested in new ways of looking at personalities and behavior.

    One thought on “A Field Guide to Earthlings: An Autistic/Asperger View of Neurotypical Behavior ”

    1. This books reverses the traditional take on ASD (Autism spectrum disorders). It is an attempt to explain the oftentimes bizarre behaviour of “Neurotypicals” (NTs) to people with asd, I’ll call them Aspies from now on. The main idea is that Aspies think in terms of ideas whereas NTs think in words/symbols. Each NT has a word map inside their head which link words to one another, a word spoken to an NT conjures up a whole set of associated words, for example wedding → {flowers, groom, prie [...]

    2. A Field Guide to Earthlings: An Autistic/Asperger View of Neurotypical BehaviorBy Ian FordPublished by Ian Ford Software Corporation ISBN9780615426198Given to me by publisher through arrangement with ReviewtheBookI am almost 69 years old, and I was not diagnosed as autistic until I was in my fifties. That diagnosis was the most liberating experience of my life; within two weeks I could no longer even remember things I had been kicking myself for since I was as young as four. Despite the neuroty [...]

    3. I want to give this book positive feedback but I'm afraid I'd offend people in the process. I don't know how to describe my personal feelings for this book in a way that would be okay for everyone. I don't even know how relevant this book is to most people, despite the book being intended for a wide range of people. And because I cannot know what other people would think of my feelings to this, I'm not going to risk getting into them publicly.So the book itself. The book is organized sensibly an [...]

    4. This is a easy, quick and fun book.It's a refreshing change of perspective to see neurotypical people described from the perspective of an autist, rather that the much more common perspective of seeing autistic people described (often poorly!) from the perspective of a nt.I think this book is a good read both for people on the autism-spectrum who wants to understand certain behavioural patterns in nts better and for nts who want to get a fresh new outside perspective on some aspects of their own [...]

    5. “A Field Guide to Earthlings: An Autistic/Asperger View of Neurotypical Behavior” by Ian Ford is basically what the title implies… a guide for people on the autism spectrum about non-autistic people, referred to as neurotypicals (NT), and why NTs behave the way they do.First off, this book is written from the view point of someone on the autism spectrum for other people on the spectrum. I have not seen a book that was written like this before for people with autism/Aspergers and I think it [...]

    6. This book changed my life! I started reading it to better understand my boyfriend and my best friend, both ASpie--but as I read I had an epiphany and recognized myself. Each chapter clarifies differences between autistic and neurotypical thinking patterns and greatly aids self-aware analysis. I would have to say that I understand more about the way I think since reading this book than at any time prior. This would be true for neurotypicals as well as ASpies, since the book explains and compares [...]

    7. 20 % is extremely valuable, 80% is nonsense!There is a lot of really valuable insight about the occasionally really strange behavior of "ordinary" people. Better than I have seen written any place else. When you run into "ordinary" people who are acting like fools, this book will help you.The rest of the time, ignore what you read in this book.

    8. Quite a few good observations, organised in sections. Strongly focused on language (as the core of culture). Even being quite aware of the subject, I was able to learn a few things (especially related to group identity).On bad part - dialogues are painful to read and hardly elucidate anything (examples of 2-3 sentences would be better). Also, it patronise NTs and magnify their NT-ness.

    9. I've not been properly diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, but I'll say that I'm definitely on that spectrum. I wouldn't say that this book has changed my life nor do I feel that every idea in this text is 100% accurate, but it is a refreshing take on how Neurotypical peoples interact from the point of view of one autistic man attempting to explain the entirety of human behaviour as if we, the auties of the world, were aliens on this planet. Which, more or less, feels very true.The very mai [...]

    10. Another three star that is a really *strong* three. I really liked the way this book went from the basics of symbols through the symbolic web and then the various ways in which NTs interact with the symbolic web. I personally could have done without the play bit. I would maybe have liked more easy to follow dialogue in the play, at least, although perhaps the fact that I found it hard to follow was all part of the problem being described! I found some of the dialogue a bit jarringly sexist, whic [...]

    11. I've been curious about this book for afew years, so had to read these reviews which have made me want to say afew things about 'NT blind spots' etc now / even though i haven't read the book yetRE people talking for hours 'without saying anything':

Convoluted and long-winded speech and text (especially that which contains specialist words) is hard for many NT's [as well as Aspies] to absorb, let alone learn from, so it's seen by some NT professors (etc) as an art form ~ those who can tolera [...]

    12. I liked it and it did give some insights about Neurotypicals. (I discussed one of the insights with an NT who told me it was completely accurate). However, I sensed what felt like a faint vein of contempt towards Neurotypicals running through the book. I hoped that as the book progressed it would change into an attitude of respect, but instead the faint trace of contempt seemed to be growing stronger.Us Aspies don't like it when someone such as Maxine Aston speaks of us with coldness and hopeles [...]

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